Sunday, May 31, 2009

[pima.nius] Whale Hunting in Tonga

11:15 PM |

Can anyone tell me the situation with whale hunting by Japanese in Tonga?
In 2007 they were going to hunt 50 (humpback) whales per year. Is this still the case?

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Saturday, May 30, 2009

[pima.nius] Re: Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples

2:17 AM |

. . .
 
sheesh, gone all quiet in here.
 
At the risk of setting off an echo, I'd like to say now seems like a good time to slow down a mo, catch our breaths, and perhaps step back a bit for the big pictures, more constructive criticism.
 
Sure, smashing each other with big ethical sticks is fun, but bruising, after awhile.
 
Ono Ivi quite rightly points to a failure by New Zealand to sign up to the UN Declaration on Indigineous Rights, only one of three countries in the world to do so.
 
Samoa is bound by stark precepts of fa'ama, whereas New Zealand Inc. seems to enjoy little or no whakama. And it is here, in this bigger picture, that the answers lie to our concerns over the quality of journalism in this country.
 
And in Samoa.
 
If one part of Polynesia media is blind to whakama, and another part is blinded by fa'ama, then we are the blind leading the blind.
 
at your feet,
 
jas
 
. . .


2009/5/30 avaiki - jason brown <avaiki.nius@gmail.com>
. . .
 
... because New Zealand Inc. is a grubby little operation with scant regard for the law.
 
Your point?

. . .

jason brown
+64 21 024 84 560

www.pacificfreedomforum.blogspot.com
http://avaiki.nius.googlepages.com
www.jpkupdate.blogspot.com

"According to Forrester Research, Enterprise 2.0, the corporate version of Web 2.0 will become a $4.6 billion industry by 2013."

http://blogs.zdnet.com/BTL/?p=8555

. . .



2009/5/30 Ono Ivi <onoivi@gmail.com>


Perhaps Avaiki can illuniate us as to why New Zealand has not joined up??



Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples


Updated 14 September 2007


UN General Assembly adopts the Declaration in September 2007

With an overwhelming majority of 143 votes in favour, only 4 negative votes cast (Canada, Australia, New Zealand, United States) and 11 abstentions, the United Nations General Assembly (GA) adopted the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples on September 13, 2007. The Declaration has been negotiated through more than 20 years between nation-states and Indigenous Peoples. Les Malezer, Chair of the International Indigenous Peoples' Caucus, welcomed the adoption of the Declaration in a statement to the General Assembly:

"The Declaration does not represent solely the viewpoint of the United Nations, nor does it represent solely the viewpoint of the Indigenous Peoples. It is a Declaration which combines our views and interests and which sets the framework for the future. It is a tool for peace and justice, based upon mutual recognition and mutual respect."

     Read the GA resolution, including the full text of the Declaration (pdf)
     Read the International Indigenous Caucus' statement (pdf)
     Read the statement of the Chair of the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues (pdf)
     Read the statement of Special Rapporteur Stavenhagen (web link)
     Read the statement of the UN Secretary General (pdf)
     Read the Press release of the Chair of the UN Permanent Forum (pdf)







Voting on the Declaration in the UN General Assembly,
13 September 2007.
Photo: Stefan Disko




Les Malezer and Vicky Tauli-Corpuz in the General Assembly Hall after the vote.
Photo: Stefan Disko 





Final adoption deferred by African states in 2006 - agreement on amended text in September 2007

It was expected that the Declaration would be finally adopted by the General Assembly in November 2006. However, at this late stage it emerged that some African States had serious difficulties with the text of the Declaration and were not prepared to accept the recommendation made by the Human Rights Council to adopt the Declaration. Namibia presented an amending resolution, which called for the vote on the Declaration to be deferred to allow more consideration. To the great surprise of all this resolution was adopted, and the final vote on the adoption of the Declaration thus postponed.

Between Novermber 2006 and  September 2007, when the Declaration was finally adopted by the UN General Assemby, indigenous peoples and states supporting the Declaration have engaged in intense dialogue with African states in an attempt to clarify the doubts, and promote the adoption of the Declaration. In early September 2007, an agreement was reached between the co-sponsors of the Declaration and the African Group of States on nine amendments to the text as adopted by the Human Rights Council in June 2006. This agreement, and the amended text, formed the basis for the draft resolution on adoption of the Declaration.

     Read the Indigenous Caucus' statement of support to the amended Declaration (pdf)
     Read IWGIA's update from June 2007 on the African states' stance on the Declaration 
     Read the African Commission on Human and Peoples' Rights' Advisory Opinion on the Declaration







More background information


     Get an introduction to the Declaration on this web site
     Read about the discussion on the Declaration at the UN General Assembly in November 2006
     Read about discussions and developments during 2006-2007 in IWGIA's News Archive




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Friday, May 29, 2009

[pima.nius] Re: Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples

10:19 PM |

. . .
 
... because New Zealand Inc. is a grubby little operation with scant regard for the law.
 
Your point?

. . .

jason brown
+64 21 024 84 560

www.pacificfreedomforum.blogspot.com
http://avaiki.nius.googlepages.com
www.jpkupdate.blogspot.com

"According to Forrester Research, Enterprise 2.0, the corporate version of Web 2.0 will become a $4.6 billion industry by 2013."

http://blogs.zdnet.com/BTL/?p=8555

. . .



2009/5/30 Ono Ivi <onoivi@gmail.com>

Perhaps Avaiki can illuniate us as to why New Zealand has not joined up??



Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples


Updated 14 September 2007


UN General Assembly adopts the Declaration in September 2007

With an overwhelming majority of 143 votes in favour, only 4 negative votes cast (Canada, Australia, New Zealand, United States) and 11 abstentions, the United Nations General Assembly (GA) adopted the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples on September 13, 2007. The Declaration has been negotiated through more than 20 years between nation-states and Indigenous Peoples. Les Malezer, Chair of the International Indigenous Peoples' Caucus, welcomed the adoption of the Declaration in a statement to the General Assembly:

"The Declaration does not represent solely the viewpoint of the United Nations, nor does it represent solely the viewpoint of the Indigenous Peoples. It is a Declaration which combines our views and interests and which sets the framework for the future. It is a tool for peace and justice, based upon mutual recognition and mutual respect."

     Read the GA resolution, including the full text of the Declaration (pdf)
     Read the International Indigenous Caucus' statement (pdf)
     Read the statement of the Chair of the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues (pdf)
     Read the statement of Special Rapporteur Stavenhagen (web link)
     Read the statement of the UN Secretary General (pdf)
     Read the Press release of the Chair of the UN Permanent Forum (pdf)







Voting on the Declaration in the UN General Assembly,
13 September 2007.
Photo: Stefan Disko




Les Malezer and Vicky Tauli-Corpuz in the General Assembly Hall after the vote.
Photo: Stefan Disko 





Final adoption deferred by African states in 2006 - agreement on amended text in September 2007

It was expected that the Declaration would be finally adopted by the General Assembly in November 2006. However, at this late stage it emerged that some African States had serious difficulties with the text of the Declaration and were not prepared to accept the recommendation made by the Human Rights Council to adopt the Declaration. Namibia presented an amending resolution, which called for the vote on the Declaration to be deferred to allow more consideration. To the great surprise of all this resolution was adopted, and the final vote on the adoption of the Declaration thus postponed.

Between Novermber 2006 and  September 2007, when the Declaration was finally adopted by the UN General Assemby, indigenous peoples and states supporting the Declaration have engaged in intense dialogue with African states in an attempt to clarify the doubts, and promote the adoption of the Declaration. In early September 2007, an agreement was reached between the co-sponsors of the Declaration and the African Group of States on nine amendments to the text as adopted by the Human Rights Council in June 2006. This agreement, and the amended text, formed the basis for the draft resolution on adoption of the Declaration.

     Read the Indigenous Caucus' statement of support to the amended Declaration (pdf)
     Read IWGIA's update from June 2007 on the African states' stance on the Declaration 
     Read the African Commission on Human and Peoples' Rights' Advisory Opinion on the Declaration







More background information


     Get an introduction to the Declaration on this web site
     Read about the discussion on the Declaration at the UN General Assembly in November 2006
     Read about discussions and developments during 2006-2007 in IWGIA's News Archive



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[pima.nius] Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples

10:05 PM |


Perhaps Avaiki can illuniate us as to why New Zealand has not joined up??



Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples


Updated 14 September 2007


UN General Assembly adopts the Declaration in September 2007

With an overwhelming majority of 143 votes in favour, only 4 negative votes cast (Canada, Australia, New Zealand, United States) and 11 abstentions, the United Nations General Assembly (GA) adopted the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples on September 13, 2007. The Declaration has been negotiated through more than 20 years between nation-states and Indigenous Peoples. Les Malezer, Chair of the International Indigenous Peoples' Caucus, welcomed the adoption of the Declaration in a statement to the General Assembly:

"The Declaration does not represent solely the viewpoint of the United Nations, nor does it represent solely the viewpoint of the Indigenous Peoples. It is a Declaration which combines our views and interests and which sets the framework for the future. It is a tool for peace and justice, based upon mutual recognition and mutual respect."

     Read the GA resolution, including the full text of the Declaration (pdf)
     Read the International Indigenous Caucus' statement (pdf)
     Read the statement of the Chair of the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues (pdf)
     Read the statement of Special Rapporteur Stavenhagen (web link)
     Read the statement of the UN Secretary General (pdf)
     Read the Press release of the Chair of the UN Permanent Forum (pdf)







Voting on the Declaration in the UN General Assembly,
13 September 2007.
Photo: Stefan Disko




Les Malezer and Vicky Tauli-Corpuz in the General Assembly Hall after the vote.
Photo: Stefan Disko 





Final adoption deferred by African states in 2006 - agreement on amended text in September 2007

It was expected that the Declaration would be finally adopted by the General Assembly in November 2006. However, at this late stage it emerged that some African States had serious difficulties with the text of the Declaration and were not prepared to accept the recommendation made by the Human Rights Council to adopt the Declaration. Namibia presented an amending resolution, which called for the vote on the Declaration to be deferred to allow more consideration. To the great surprise of all this resolution was adopted, and the final vote on the adoption of the Declaration thus postponed.

Between Novermber 2006 and  September 2007, when the Declaration was finally adopted by the UN General Assemby, indigenous peoples and states supporting the Declaration have engaged in intense dialogue with African states in an attempt to clarify the doubts, and promote the adoption of the Declaration. In early September 2007, an agreement was reached between the co-sponsors of the Declaration and the African Group of States on nine amendments to the text as adopted by the Human Rights Council in June 2006. This agreement, and the amended text, formed the basis for the draft resolution on adoption of the Declaration.

     Read the Indigenous Caucus' statement of support to the amended Declaration (pdf)
     Read IWGIA's update from June 2007 on the African states' stance on the Declaration 
     Read the African Commission on Human and Peoples' Rights' Advisory Opinion on the Declaration







More background information


     Get an introduction to the Declaration on this web site
     Read about the discussion on the Declaration at the UN General Assembly in November 2006
     Read about discussions and developments during 2006-2007 in IWGIA's News Archive
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[pima.nius] Re: Fakalofa lahi atu

9:51 PM |

. . .
 
oh, and, um, bra, it's "free our minds", not "rule..."

. . .



2009/5/30 Peni <peniamina89@gmail.com>

Again you try to change the story and bring it back to yourself just
like the lady in the other story. I am this. This is that. That is the
way it is. So, you think bringing over a rifle and a pistol for your
private collections means that you are a big time gun smuggler? You
see how you try to make it bigger than it is.
And, those reporters in the Islands knew it. So, they went to have a
cup-a-tea instead because it wasn't even any news. I wonder would a
Maori reporter on Te Karere or Marae or Te Kaia come up with the same
story the Lady did? If you talk about reporting in the backyard of the
Pacific I think I would trust these journalists to tell a truer story
than what did this lady. She was not showing us a Pacific angle. It
was more like they do on those other bllsht programs. You should know
better.
*None but ourselves can rule our minds.* --~--~---------~--~----~------------~-------~--~----~
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[pima.nius] Re: Fakalofa lahi atu

9:30 PM |

. . .
 
sorry peni, can you send that again? I can't seem to find any weblinks.

. . .



2009/5/30 Peni <peniamina89@gmail.com>

Again you try to change the story and bring it back to yourself just
like the lady in the other story. I am this. This is that. That is the
way it is. So, you think bringing over a rifle and a pistol for your
private collections means that you are a big time gun smuggler? You
see how you try to make it bigger than it is.
And, those reporters in the Islands knew it. So, they went to have a
cup-a-tea instead because it wasn't even any news. I wonder would a
Maori reporter on Te Karere or Marae or Te Kaia come up with the same
story the Lady did? If you talk about reporting in the backyard of the
Pacific I think I would trust these journalists to tell a truer story
than what did this lady. She was not showing us a Pacific angle. It
was more like they do on those other bllsht programs. You should know
better.
*None but ourselves can rule our minds.* --~--~---------~--~----~------------~-------~--~----~
- - - - - - - - -

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[pima.nius] Re: Fakalofa lahi atu

9:28 PM |

. . .
 
Interesting ... now we're getting somewhere. Emphasis added.
 
. . .
2009/5/30 Ono Ivi <onoivi@gmail.com>
In the case of your defamatory statement about the "Makoi boys" you incorrectly suggest that "older dealers" were referring to these boys in particular. The man described as a "drug Lord" was referring in generalities to younger people.


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[pima.nius] Re: Fakalofa lahi atu

9:19 PM |

The case of the Police commissioner shows just how difficult it actually is to smuggle things into Samoa. Even the Police Commissioner cannot get away with it. This exemplifies the opposite to what "the lady" was trying to suggest. And, he got what was judged to be appropriate punishment by the courts of Samoa. Just because you don't agree with it doesn't make it wrong - it is their judiciary.

In the case of your defamatory statement about the "Makoi boys" you incorrectly suggest that "older dealers" were referring to these boys in particular. The man described as a "drug Lord" was referring in generalities to younger people.

The suggestion that these young men who were building a house before being called over to appear in a this "Big Time Production" are drug dealers and beyond that that they deal to children is thus unfounded.


From affidavits and reports around the issue, it seems these boys were actually pretty harmless loafers getting by in the Islands and although filling their time with simple luxuries could hardly be described as an organised crime gang. To describe them as such is just preposterous - even if they did play up to the camera acting like "tough gangsters." 

Anyway, the issue is about the fact that TVOne is still running a promo featuring the story. It may not be a case of right or wrong. It is more a case of respect for the sensibilities of a significant audience.


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[pima.nius] Re: Fakalofa lahi atu

8:23 PM |

Again you try to change the story and bring it back to yourself just
like the lady in the other story. I am this. This is that. That is the
way it is. So, you think bringing over a rifle and a pistol for your
private collections means that you are a big time gun smuggler? You
see how you try to make it bigger than it is.
And, those reporters in the Islands knew it. So, they went to have a
cup-a-tea instead because it wasn't even any news. I wonder would a
Maori reporter on Te Karere or Marae or Te Kaia come up with the same
story the Lady did? If you talk about reporting in the backyard of the
Pacific I think I would trust these journalists to tell a truer story
than what did this lady. She was not showing us a Pacific angle. It
was more like they do on those other bllsht programs. You should know
better.
*None but ourselves can rule our minds.*
--~--~---------~--~----~------------~-------~--~----~
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[pima.nius] Re: Fakalofa lahi atu

6:36 PM |

. . .
 
onya peni,
 
your personal references are more oblique, if consistently inaccurate, but we are, thank you, getting back a little closer to issues and facts.
 
For the record: I dropped out of high school in 1981, and have no history of tertiary achievement. I was raised on the island of Rarotonga since I was 12, and spent the vast bulk of my career on simple, island issues, like offshore banking, environmental degradation, human rights issues and corruption.
 
As well as being inaccurate, your reversal of my earlier comment about university trained minds assumed I'm that brainy. I'm not. But I've had a quarter century of luxuriating in  bullshit spun by masters of the trade, and that experience allows me to see you have successfully reduced a vastly complex story to a yes-she-did, no-she-didn't argument.
 
Is that all you fullus got?
 
Okay, how about this, then? Why did the Commissioner of Police refuse to respond to One News questions about drugs and guns in Samoa? Or this: why did the cabinet block a full  investigation into allegations of gun smuggling by the Commissioner of Police? Why were media blocked from reporting the court inquiry? Why did a daily newspaper boycott the inquiry rather than extract the information for their own records and, possibly, publish in more media friendly jurisdictions?
 
Mere details. How are journalists supposed to get "the facts" when the REAL problem is a government that actively suppresses the facts?
 
A consistent theme throughout has been that the reporter should have gone to the PM for comment. Why? This is not a political matter, it's a crime matter, and the man at the centre of the web is being protected by his cronies in cabiet. At least that's how it looks, unless you've got a weblink that gives us another perspective, Peni.
 
As for your little mumble about looking in the backyard, Peni, define "backyard." Does that include island journalists who have written more island stories than you've had hot umu? Or are island journalists banned from entering the mainstream media and presenting a Pacific perspective to regional issues? In fact, before this reporter, when can you remember Pacific perspectives and issues getting any coverage at all, outside of cyclones and Fiji coups - oops used the F word.
 
Instead of whining and moaning about a promo, for goodness sake, Peni stop playing the innocent native and man up to our shared histories, written in blood, through two world wars, and, yes, New Zealand slaughter of innocents, for which Helen Clark made formal apology, something you might know as ifoga. If that's not enough, take pride in a culture that begins in Savaii, wends its way through Havaii, Hawaii, Hawaiki and Avaiki. Is that "backyard" enough for you?
 
Or would you prefer to remain a colonised mind and believe that there are no links between us in Polynesia, that we are not neighbours, and that we are not our brothers' keeper? You can have it either way, but you can't have both.
 
emanticipate yourself from mental slavery,
 
jas

. . .
2009/5/30 Peni <peniamina89@gmail.com>

Your "University trained mind" may be too sophisticate for this simple
islander. But with all your training should they have taught you to
base allegations on fact. As in the item, you state this thing, "fast
becoming a conduit" but like in the item you don't back it up with any
numbers or even instances where this has been discovered to be the
case.
People have guns in Samoa to shoot cows and pigs and wild dogs (I saw
this written somewhere else). But there are hardly any murders or
instances when guns get used besides killing animals. The situation in
New Zealand is much much worse and like they say, sort out the
backyard before you go to someone elses. --~--~---------~--~----~------------~-------~--~----~
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[pima.nius] Re: Fakalofa lahi atu

5:22 PM |

Your "University trained mind" may be too sophisticate for this simple
islander. But with all your training should they have taught you to
base allegations on fact. As in the item, you state this thing, "fast
becoming a conduit" but like in the item you don't back it up with any
numbers or even instances where this has been discovered to be the
case.
People have guns in Samoa to shoot cows and pigs and wild dogs (I saw
this written somewhere else). But there are hardly any murders or
instances when guns get used besides killing animals. The situation in
New Zealand is much much worse and like they say, sort out the
backyard before you go to someone elses.
--~--~---------~--~----~------------~-------~--~----~
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[pima.nius] Re: Fakalofa lahi atu

5:04 PM |

. . .
 
Thanks for the clarification, Peni.
 
Can you provide me the weblink for that?
 
Or should we just take this as more of your ball handling skills?

. . .



2009/5/30 Peni <peniamina89@gmail.com>

You are the journalist. But you fail to recognise that there were in
fact no death threats.
This was again another made up story which you have again perpetuated.
Who is now ignoring the facts? --~--~---------~--~----~------------~-------~--~----~
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[pima.nius] Re: Fakalofa lahi atu

5:03 PM |

. . .
 
Ah, such learned discourse.
 
The joys of a university-trained mind, able to sift generalities for specificalities and then mangle them all out of recognition.
 
Sorry, but that's getting personal, and as Ono Ivi quite rightly says, no need for that, especially when you can get other people to do it for you.
 
Comparing Barbara Dreaver with 60 Minutes is like comparing Aaron Taouma with Tagata Pasifika - one is a credible news reporter with a public history of solid research, and the other is a tightly defined infotainment package popular with the punters.
 
Let's get back to the facts. As the story pointed out originally, Samoa is becoming a conduit for guns and drugs because of demand from NEW ZEALAND. We can get arty-farty and deconstruct post-modern journalism all we like, but the fact is that the guns exist, the drugs exist and, yes, gangs are involved, as in organised crime.
 
No amount of sophistry from Ono Ivi or their ilk change, reduce or diminish these facts.
 
We can discuss the boys from Makoi till the cows come home, and whether or not their after hour activities include selling drugs to children, as suggested by older dealers. Certainly they look stupid enough, refusing to cover up even when asked to by a One News reporter carrying a One News microphone, with not one but two HUGE cameras with One News plastered prominently on their gun metal flanks.
 
Yes, it is ethically improper for TVNZ to continue screening promos for a story under active complaint, but instinct suggests this will come to be seen as a rather small aspect of what promises to be an entirely fascinating exercise in due process.
 
fa'afetai,
 
jason

. . .




2009/5/30 Ono Ivi <onoivi@gmail.com>
Hey no need to get personal Peni. It was a sad turning of events and everyone knows that it was sensationalised. Now Samoa knows what Fiji has been through. As for "the reporter in question" remember she did two stories while in Samoa, the one everyone would like wiped and the other an adoption story. Both classic "investigation" type stories in the vein of "Sunday" or "60-Minutes." But one was acceptable to the public and the other was not. In a media-ocracy the public voice should be a factor in deciding. Yes, everyone remembers the one "bad" story a journalist may do and forget all of the other "good" stories. Should this be the deciding factor? In this case, the reporter in question weathered the storm but the organisation behind her was remiss in continuing to run a promo (as Peni says) featuring this story. This is so because it was undergoing a BSA complaints procedure and there was a clear and loud outcry against it from ethnic media. You should both be thankful there was a media who had the guts to run counter stories - without them it would have gone unchecked by mainstream sources. The story was unacceptable but does this mean the reporter should lose her job? This is a serious question one has to ask. Most people have moved on but can they (the Pacific community) now trust their Correspondent? Or, has it always been that this position is not to correspond or represent from a Pacific point of view but to apply mainstream prejudices on Pacific issues? What would happen if the position was lost? Is no news better than some news? Though I still don't see what is wrong with plain old - good news or even straight reporting of real issues. This brings us back to the very conditions under which these reports are made - reporter centred and driven (constructed) stories. But it is not just the focus on the reporter which is of question in this style of reporting, it is the combination of this and the hightening of realities through editing and acting that is of question. The reporter here is the main protagonist who is going through a journey and telling the viewer what's happening on the way. But the journey and the correspondence is constructed and the presentation is acted. It is a performance. It is stylised and set-up to achieve preset aims (just as lines of questioning seek to fit with the preset storyline and only answers which fit this make it to the cut). The reporter goes out into the field with the story already made up. Then the reporter seeks to set-up situations which exemplify that story visually and contextually. This is different from a person who goes into the field with perhaps a key question and lets things unfold naturally. They may still report on events as they occur but may find these do not fit the reporters pre-thought ideas of what there was to find. It may even prove these presumptions to be wrong. At the least they may correspond that things aren't as simple as a ten second sound bite or showing a trunk-load of guns (which in this case the reporter was unaware of their origins or if they were actually licensed/legal or not). Suffice it to say, this brings this style of reporting into question. But what should people expect? As Jason points out news is "consistently sexed up."

But the question here is not about the report itself. It is about the news carrier of a potentially defamatory and BSA standards breaking item continuing to run a promo (featuring that item) even though it is under BSA investigation.




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[pima.nius] Re: Fakalofa lahi atu

5:02 PM |

You are the journalist. But you fail to recognise that there were in
fact no death threats.
This was again another made up story which you have again perpetuated.
Who is now ignoring the facts?
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[pima.nius] Re: Fakalofa lahi atu

4:42 PM |

. . .
 
gee peni,
 
What well constructed sentences. Must be nice know you have friends who can feed you your lines. I just can't imagine who that might be, some slimy-as snake in the grass , )
 
See, that's the trouble with dropping the ball and playing the man, Peni. It gets all messy. The issues get forgotten. Discussions generate more heat than light. But of course that's exactly what some people want, isn't it Peni?
 
For us to forget allllll about the facts and focus on the personalities.
 
It's a classic public relations tactic from ancient times, ay Peni? You've been fooled by it, and even those who think they are ever so cleverly spin doctoring are only fooling themselves, too.
 
Your revelation that the reporter involved is my ex-wife as if it were some kind of big secret only confirms how out of touch you are, ay Peni? Not only is it common knowledge across the region, I have disclosed that relationship on pubicly available sites and to collegial forums since way back when.
 
See, Peni, that's the trouble when you let yourself be led around by the nose by mind melding morons, your brain short-circuits and you forget the first fundamental lesson of public discourse: do your homework. Try Google.
 
After you've checked my credentials, dumb bum, you can use the same search engine to dredge up the affidavits in Samoa. You might even like to print them out and compare them for inconsistencies, or would that be too much like hard work?
 
Easy to make sneering criticisms, ay Peni, a bit more difficult to live up to what you urge us journalists to do all the time: check your facts.
 
I am somewhat confused, further, by your comment about eighties journalism. I guess you prefer the 90's and 00 versions, with their outstanding coverage of issues like terrorism, globalisation and economic development. Yes, journalism at TVNZ is sexed up, as it is all over the developed world, because you know why Peni? Cretinous consumers like you love the clash and flash much more than they like actually reading the damn script and making up their own mind. That's what rates Peni. It's a style. Sometimes it's a style that overwhelms the substance, but don't worry, Peni, the substance is still there.
 
My suggestion, Peni, is that you spend as much time on the substance of a story as sniffing around my underpants.
 
For the record: my comments relating to issues surrounding the TVNZ story on drugs and guns in Samoa have nothing to do with the fact that the reporter is my ex-wife. They have everything to do with the fact that a colleague got death threats because of a story she wrote, and the failure of her colleagues in Samoa and across the region to do anything about it. Issues surrounding this story and reactions to it strike to the heart of fundamental human rights that, in Samoa as elsewhere, are routinely abused under a culture of impunity, enabled by the politics of deceipt.
 
Stay tuned, Peni and the ghost writers !  Keep up those ball handling skills !!
 
kia toa,
 
jason

. . .

2009/5/30 Peni <peniamina89@gmail.com>

I have just heard that you are the ex-wife of the reporter in
question.
I understand now why you are throwing around such unsubstantiated
allegations.
I guess your nineteen eighties journalism allows for this sort of
thing to happen.
I see how the reporter in questions made up the story.
You both have the same background.
As sexed up as it is.



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[pima.nius] Re: Fakalofa lahi atu

4:12 PM |

. . .
 
peni,
 
Not so and you're letting your ignorance of proper due process lead you into paranoia.
 
When the actual piece was screened at the Pacific Freedom Forum in Apia, Samoa, there was robust debate afterwards. I had not seen the introduction previously, and feel that the story was softest at that point. I said so, and urged the government of Samoa to pursue its complaint with the BSA - as it had at that stage yet to do so, despite a week or so of generating media controversy.
 
As I said then and say now, let due process take its course. My comment about One News was in no way to suggest that TVNZ has the final say on anything. If anyone feels the BSA ruling is a whitewash, then it's also entirely proper to say so. But, hey, that's just me, don't let the facts get in the way of some good old fashioned hysteria.
 
As a point of ethics, I agree with the point raised by my colleague Ono Ivi that it is improper for TVNZ to continue running the promo while the story it illustrates is under active complaint. There was no complaint at the time when the promo began running, and it is entirely proper, also, for a media organisation to assess the validity of a news story and then decide whether or not to back their reporter. TVNZ has made that decision.
 
meitaki ma'ata,
 
jason

. . .

jason brown
+64 21 024 84 560

www.pacificfreedomforum.blogspot.com
http://avaiki.nius.googlepages.com
www.jpkupdate.blogspot.com

"According to Forrester Research, Enterprise 2.0, the corporate version of Web 2.0 will become a $4.6 billion industry by 2013."

http://blogs.zdnet.com/BTL/?p=8555

. . .

2009/5/29 Peni <peniamina89@gmail.com>

Thank you for your response but does that mean TVOne is the decider of
what is correct even before it is judged by the BSA?
I wonder what is the point of the BSA then?
I think if a complaint has been made then they should respect this and
withdraw until a decision is made.
This would show respect for transparency and process would it not?
Rather than arrogant thinking we are right no matter what.



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[pima.nius] Re: Fakalofa lahi atu

7:14 AM |

Hey no need to get personal Peni. It was a sad turning of events and everyone knows that it was sensationalised. Now Samoa knows what Fiji has been through. As for "the reporter in question" remember she did two stories while in Samoa, the one everyone would like wiped and the other an adoption story. Both classic "investigation" type stories in the vein of "Sunday" or "60-Minutes." But one was acceptable to the public and the other was not. In a media-ocracy the public voice should be a factor in deciding. Yes, everyone remembers the one "bad" story a journalist may do and forget all of the other "good" stories. Should this be the deciding factor? In this case, the reporter in question weathered the storm but the organisation behind her was remiss in continuing to run a promo (as Peni says) featuring this story. This is so because it was undergoing a BSA complaints procedure and there was a clear and loud outcry against it from ethnic media. You should both be thankful there was a media who had the guts to run counter stories - without them it would have gone unchecked by mainstream sources. The story was unacceptable but does this mean the reporter should lose her job? This is a serious question one has to ask. Most people have moved on but can they (the Pacific community) now trust their Correspondent? Or, has it always been that this position is not to correspond or represent from a Pacific point of view but to apply mainstream prejudices on Pacific issues? What would happen if the position was lost? Is no news better than some news? Though I still don't see what is wrong with plain old - good news or even straight reporting of real issues. This brings us back to the very conditions under which these reports are made - reporter centred and driven (constructed) stories. But it is not just the focus on the reporter which is of question in this style of reporting, it is the combination of this and the hightening of realities through editing and acting that is of question. The reporter here is the main protagonist who is going through a journey and telling the viewer what's happening on the way. But the journey and the correspondence is constructed and the presentation is acted. It is a performance. It is stylised and set-up to achieve preset aims (just as lines of questioning seek to fit with the preset storyline and only answers which fit this make it to the cut). The reporter goes out into the field with the story already made up. Then the reporter seeks to set-up situations which exemplify that story visually and contextually. This is different from a person who goes into the field with perhaps a key question and lets things unfold naturally. They may still report on events as they occur but may find these do not fit the reporters pre-thought ideas of what there was to find. It may even prove these presumptions to be wrong. At the least they may correspond that things aren't as simple as a ten second sound bite or showing a trunk-load of guns (which in this case the reporter was unaware of their origins or if they were actually licensed/legal or not). Suffice it to say, this brings this style of reporting into question. But what should people expect? As Jason points out news is "consistently sexed up."

But the question here is not about the report itself. It is about the news carrier of a potentially defamatory and BSA standards breaking item continuing to run a promo (featuring that item) even though it is under BSA investigation.

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[pima.nius] Re: Fakalofa lahi atu

5:03 AM |

I have just heard that you are the ex-wife of the reporter in
question.
I understand now why you are throwing around such unsubstantiated
allegations.
I guess your nineteen eighties journalism allows for this sort of
thing to happen.
I see how the reporter in questions made up the story.
You both have the same background.
As sexed up as it is.
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[pima.nius] Re: Fakalofa lahi atu

12:54 AM |

Thank you for your response but does that mean TVOne is the decider of
what is correct even before it is judged by the BSA?
I wonder what is the point of the BSA then?
I think if a complaint has been made then they should respect this and
withdraw until a decision is made.
This would show respect for transparency and process would it not?
Rather than arrogant thinking we are right no matter what.
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[pima.nius] PR: FALEOMAVAEGA SAYS AUSTRALIA/NEW ZEALAND HEAVY-HANDED APPROACH TO FIJI MAKES MATTERS WORSE; U.S. ROLE REQUIRED

12:41 AM |

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                           Contact:  Dr. Lisa Williams (202) 225-8577

 

 

Washington, D.C.

FALEOMAVAEGA SAYS AUSTRALIA/NEW ZEALAND HEAVY-HANDED APPROACH TO FIJI MAKES MATTERS WORSE; U.S. ROLE REQUIRED

 

Congressman Eni F.H. Faleomavaega, Chairman of the House Foreign Affairs Subcommittee on Asia, the Pacific and the Global Environment, today published an op-ed in The Sydney Morning Herald and its sister publication, the Brisbane Times, concerning the failure of New Zealand and Australian policies toward Fiji, and the need for a more pro-active and independent American role in addressing Fiji's problems.

In the op-ed, Faleomavaega stated that, "For too long, the United States has deferred to Australia and New Zealand in the region, despite their obvious policy failures. With regard to Fiji, Canberra and Wellington have employed heavy-handed tactics and misguided sanctions that have hurt average Fijians far more than the interim government at which they were targeted. Punishing average Fijians will never solve the country's problems.  Rather, by making life in Fiji increasingly difficult, Canberra and Wellington may well be sowing the seeds of civil unrest and violence."

Faleomavaega recently visited Fiji and met with leaders from all sides involved in the current crisis, including interim Prime Minister Bainimarama, and former Prime Ministers Qarase and Chaudhry.

"Based on the discussions I had with Fijian leaders, I am more convinced than ever that the United States should play a more pro-active and independent role, one offering the country a better chance of emerging from its current crisis, eliminating its 'coup culture' once and for all and establishing a more stable government," Faleomavaega said.

            The consequences of the failed policies of Australia and New Zealand and the absence of American leadership may even lead to the development of a new strategic reality in the Asia-Pacific region.  "As Australia and New Zealand attempt to strong-arm Fiji into complying with their dictates, China has moved in to fill the vacuum, offering grants, concessionary loans and enhanced trade opportunities.  Of course, as a country with global economic reach, I commend China's efforts to provide economic and financial assistance to these island nations.  After all, China is just as much part of our Pacific community as Japan, New Zealand, Australia and the United States," Faleomavaega wrote.

            Faleomavaega noted that the unique cultural and traditional circumstances must be taken into account in addressing Fiji's crisis, stating that, "Foreign policy elites in Australia and New Zealand erroneously view the region with a Eurocentric mentality without having a better sense of appreciation of Fiji's colonial history. In Fiji, for example, the country's complex ethnic mix – coupled with its chiefly, provincial, religious and family rivalries – is not adequately appreciated by Canberra and Wellington. Fortunately, the Obama Administration is gaining a better understanding of Fiji – and how our friends in Canberra and Wellington have dropped the ball."

"Fiji's interim Prime Minister Frank Bainimarama has made it clear that he intends to draft a constitution that will reflect the country's unique culture and history.  He has also promised to enact electoral reforms that will establish equal suffrage and to hold free, fair and democratic elections.  I believe the United States should take the interim Prime Minister at his word, and help Fiji move that process along as swiftly as possible," Faleomavaega concluded.

The op-ed is available at http://www.smh.com.au/opinion/us-should-act-smart-and-help-fiji-make-reforms-20090527-bnm2.html and at http://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/opinion/us-should-act-smart-and-help-fiji-make-reforms-20090527-bnm2.html.

 

--End--

 

Solomona Aoelua

Office of Congressman Faleomavaega

2422 Rayburn House Office Building

Washington, DC  20515

Phone:  202-225-8577

Fax:      202-225-8757

Website: www.house.gov/faleomavaega/

 

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aotearoa, new zealand
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[pima.nius] Fwd: KOMUNITAS PAPUA FW: [wp] Amnesty International Report 2009- state of the world's human rights

12:39 AM |



Amnesty International Report 2009 State of the world's human rights
 









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pima.nius@gmail.com
aotearoa, new zealand
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[pima.nius] PR: MATARIKI - A STELLAR TIME TO CELEBRATE - ON MAORI TELEVISION

12:37 AM |

PUBLICITY RELEASE                                                         

THURSDAY MAY 28 2009


MATARIKI - A STELLAR TIME TO CELEBRATE – ON MAORI TELEVISION

 

Some of this country's best-loved musicians have joined forces with international chef Peter Gordon to celebrate Matariki – the Maori New Year - with a spectacular concert and feast.

 

The event they created, held at Turangawaewae Marae with the blessing of Kingi Tuheitia, has been captured in a two-part series that marks this special time of year, in MATARIKI AHUNGA NUI, and MATARIKI HUNGA NUI, and will screen on Maori Television on June 28 and July 5 at 8.00 PM.

 

Drawing around 700 guests, and billed as the biggest gourmet hangi in Aotearoa, the event features a stellar line up of musicians, including Dave Dobbyn, Boh Runga, Nesian Mystic, Moana Maniapoto and the Tribe, Tama Waipara, Maisey Rika, Whirimako Black and Pania Papa, with the talented Matai Smith on hosting duties.

 

Meanwhile, the marae kitchen – already renowned for its ability to put on a great spread for the multitudes – is in the hands of ex-pat chef Peter Gordon, his task: to spice up the traditional hangi fare with contemporary gourmet flavours.

 

"The focus has been to put on a really good show, and to raise up the profile of Matariki as an event," says Hinewehi Mohi, whose involvement in the event has been three-fold.  Mohi performs, produces the programme, and represents the event's official charity – the Raukatauri Music Therapy Centre.

 

"It has come together really well, and I was really overwhelmed by people's aroha and support."

 

The making of episode one has been guided by the proverb Matariki ahunga nui - provider of plentiful food, and shows the gourmet hangi at preparation stage, as Gordon gets to work with the marae kaimahi, or workers. 

 

The menu - one of the true stars of the event - features hangi staples such as pork, mutton and chicken, but with new exotic twists, from marinades of Thai spices, kawakawa and coconut, to stuffings of apple, walnut and sage.

 

Also in part one: scenes of the traditional powhiri at Turangawaewae, and interviews with those involved in the event, who explain why they wanted to give their time. Perfomers also give their thoughts on the meaning and purpose of Matariki, traditionally a time for feasting, family, remembering and celebrating.

 

Part two is inspired by the words Matariki hunga nui – Matariki has many admirers, in which video 'postcards' are sent in from friends and supporters around the world, in places such as London, New York and Japan.  The hangi is pulled up and served, and performances continue against a backdrop designed by artist Tracey Tawhiao, building to a grand finale in which Kingi Tuheitia makes his way to a stage.

 

A time to celebrate the year that has gone, and the new one ahead.  Tune in to Maori Television for MATARIKI AHUNGA NUI and MATARIKI HUNGA NUI, on June 28 and July 5 at 8.00 PM.

 

Ends

 

For more information contact:

Merilee Andrews

Publicist
Maori Television
DDI 09 539 7092

MOB 021 274 0495

merilee.andrews@maoritelevision.com

 

 
PO Box 113-017, Newmarket, Auckland 1149, New Zealand
9-15 Davis Crescent, Newmarket, Auckland 1023, New Zealand
http://www.maoritelevision.com/

 

cid:image001.jpg@01C8277F.33B021D0             logo tereo             cid:image002.jpg@01C8277F.33B021D0

 




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[pima.nius] PR: Labour: Goff: National's decade of deferrals creates $35B Super hole

12:36 AM |

29 May 2009     Media Statement        
National's decade of deferrals creates $35B Super hole 

National's decision for a decade of deferrals to the "Cullen" Super Fund will leave a super-sized hole in the New Zealand Superannuation Fund when it comes time for entitlements to be paid from it, Labour Leader Phil Goff says.

"Closer analysis of Treasury's figures by Labour has revealed that in 2031, when withdrawals from the fund commence, the fund will be short by $35 billion dollars," Phil Goff says.

"It shows that on top of the shortfall of $19.5 billion of contributions to the fund, earnings and interest of around $15 billion will also be lost.

"This decision has effectively killed the Fund which many New Zealanders are relying on for their retirement.

"There was a political consensus around Superannuation in order to provide New Zealanders with certainty so that they could plan for retirement. This has now been broken.

"By the time the baby-boomer generation retires, 1 in 5 New Zealanders will be reliant on Superannuation.

"The 'Cullen' Fund was to prefund that cost so that Super would remain affordable. National's decision means this will no longer be the case.

"This will put future Superannuation entitlements at current levels in jeopardy and may mean the people who have paid taxes towards Super will no longer get what they paid for.

"Just who do John Key and Bill English think is going to plug that $35 billion hole in 20 years time?
 
"Instead of addressing the problem now, John Key and Bill English are transferring the problem to the future. But every year it will get increasingly harder for future governments to make up the shortfall.

"That is the legacy of Bill English's Budget," Phil Goff said.

Note: Graph Attached

<<PRgoffSuperMay29.doc>>

Contact Richard Trow 021 278 7233

Picture (Metafile)



Kris Faafoi
Press Secretary
Hon. Phil Goff
Leader of the Opposition
+64 4 817 8284
+64 21 648 859
kris.faafoi@parliament.govt.nz




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[pima.nius] PR: RS&T a big loser in Budget 2009

12:35 AM |

29 May 2009     Media Statement        
 RS&T a big loser in Budget 2009       
       
Research, science and technology is one of the big losers of Budget 2009, with small increases in some areas offset by massive funding cuts across the board, says Research and Development, Science and Technology spokesperson Moana Mackey.

"The Government claims that "Budget 2009 recognises the critical role science and technology will play in the economic recovery through substantial extra funding."  This is misleading at best and dishonest at worst.

"While the Research Science and Technology Minister has trumpeted small increases in some areas, the real story is cuts in tertiary education, the abolition of Labour's R&D tax credits, the gutting of the Fast Forward Fund and the smallest increase in Vote RS&T in many years," Moana Mackey says.

"The Minister is claiming "substantial extra funding" of $128 million, but in fact Vote RS&T only increased by some $25 million.

"This was paid for by slashing $630 million from the sector with the abolition of Labour's R&D tax credits. Only a National Minister would have the cheek to strip over $600 million in funding from the sector and call this an increase.

"This doesn't even begin to take into account the cuts to Labour's Fast Forward Fund. As recently as February Agriculture Minister David Carter was promising that National's replacement would be equal to or better than Labour's.  But the fund unveiled by National is not only worth $800 million less to the sector, it lacks one of the most critical aspects of Labour's fund, which was long-term funding certainty," Moana Mackey says.

"Labour's Fast Forward Fund guaranteed stable research funding for the food and pastoral sectors for the next 10-15 years. Under National's poor imitation, this critical sector will have to come cap in hand to Government for a year by year appropriation.

"As governments around the world are investing heavily in RS&T as part of their economic stimulus packages, our Government is heading backwards at a rate of knots."

Contact: Moana Mackey 021 411 110
<<MackeyBudgetRS@T.doc>>

Ruth Berry
Press Secretary
Office of Hon Phil Goff
Leader of the Opposition
+64 4 817 9685 or +64 21 833 353


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pacific islands media association
pima.nius@gmail.com
aotearoa, new zealand
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