Thursday, September 30, 2010

[pima.nius] Free Online Legal and HIV/AIDS awareness course

11:46 AM |



The free online skills training & certification provider ALISON.com has launched a new course introducing the basics of Legal Studies. The course is ideal for those looking to educate themselves on what effective law is, the difference between civil and criminal law and how court procedure typically run.

More at

http://zunia.org/post/new-free-online-legal-studies-course-release/


Also a free HIV/AIDS awareness course available here too for those who cover those topics.

 

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[pima.nius] FIJI: Opinion - The end of press freedom

11:41 AM |


Title – 7048 FIJI: Opinion - The end of press freedom
Date – 29 September 2010
Byline – Savea Sano Malifa
Origin – Pacific Media Watch
Source – International Press Institute, 29/09/10
Copyright – IPI
Status – Unabridged
----------------------------
* Pacific Media Watch Online - check the website for archive and links:
www.pacmediawatch.aut.ac.nz

* Post a comment on this story at PMW Right of Reply:
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IPI Blog opinion:
THE END OF PRESS FREEDOM IN FIJI
http://www.freemedia.at/singleview/5175/

By Savea Sano Malifa

VIENNA (International Press Institute/Pacific Media Watch): Today in Fiji press freedom no longer exists. It is effectively being silenced by military leader and interim Prime Minister Frank Bainimarama. It started on 28 June 2010 when Attorney-General Aiyaz Sayed-Khaiyum formally announced that the Fiji government's Media Decree had become law.

The new law dictates, in part, that "the content of any media service must not include material which is against public interest or order, against national interest, offends good taste or decency, or creates communal discord." It also requires that every article published in a newspaper must have a byline. The law says journalists convicted of breaching the decree are liable to a fine not in excess of $F500,000, and their editors and publishers are liable to fines not in excess of $F100,000, or imprisonment for five years, or both.

In addition, the new law limits the foreign ownership of media companies in Fiji to no more than 10 per cent, and allows majority shareholding to be held by either Fijian citizens or permanent residents. It also gives three months for foreign-owned companies to comply or cease to operate.

As a result, the Fiji Times, the country's oldest newspaper owned by News Ltd of Australia [PMW editor: Now wholly owned by the Motibhai Group in Fiji since this article was written], is understood to be looking for a buyer. It is not clear what the country's third biggest newspaper, the Fiji Daily Post, also owned by an Australian, who holds 51%, is planning to do.

But the media law is part of the government's multiracial, multicultural reform programme apparently aimed at streamlining the distribution of wealth in the country.

Although the programme is designed to help indigenous Fijians improve their earning power, it fails miserably to bridge the widening gap already existing between them and their now much wealthier counterparts, who are mainly immigrants.

In fact this gap has been a worrying one. It is seen as the major cause of the series of political coups that have been plaguing society - especially the indigenous part of it - since the mid-eighties.

And now Frank Bainimarama comes along, thinks he can solve the problem by chasing away foreign business owners, give opportunities to local people so that they can help enrich themselves, and he's finding himself running smack into more tenacious problems than he had envisioned.

The point is that you just can't solve problems of this nature with dictatorial decrees using military muscle. Which means the Fijian military strongman is obviously blinded by power. We say this because many have tried before him, and many have failed.

Now the idea that the Fiji Times is likely to close down is said to be causing much worry to the company's employees numbering close to 300 - the majority of whom are indigenous Fijians - and their families.

That is just the opposite of what Bainimarama has been trying to do; he is seen to have been putting the pressure on foreign investors so that they pack up and leave, and then allow the locals to take over.

However, he has apparently misjudged those he has wanted to help, because instead of showing any interest at all in Bainimarama's plans, many of them are understood to have started looking at emigrating to either New Zealand or Australia in the hope of finding jobs and a better life there.

Meanwhile, Bainimarama's unchallenged media law - which deprives the people of his country of their freedom of expression and right to know - has created another problem. It has caused frustration among members and supporters of the regional media body, the Pacific Islands News Association (PINA), based in Fiji.

Since (PINA) has been keeping quiet about the Fiji government's repulsive media law, its disappointed supporters and critics decided they could not remain silent any longer.

The first to speak up was the vice-president of PINA John Woods, who is also the managing editor of the Cook Islands News.

During an interview with Radio Australia, he was asked: ".... the base of it is that you're protesting against the Fiji media decree. Can I just ask you what in particular you are most upset about that this decree introduces?"

Woods answered: "Well the obvious strictures of insisting that foreign investment be reduced to a tiny percentage, that journalists are subject to imprisonment and horrendous fines if they contravene the decree's restrictions. These things are oppressive, barbaric, and in themselves are enough reason to pull PINA out of Fiji, which should have been done long ago, and for at least the organisation to speak up and challenge the military puppets who have invented this ridiculous, barbaric 19th century set of rules."

That was on 1 July 2010. Woods then resigned as PINA vice-president in "disgust". PINA's general manager, incidentally, is a Fijian.

It was then that during online discussions a group of media owners including the writer, senior journalists and concerned media personnel, decided they no longer wanted to have anything to do with PINA.

They agreed that PINA was no longer effective in what it had been entrusted to do - which was to promote and defend press freedom in the region, ensure the free flow of information was encouraged, and that the public was not deprived of its right to know.

They decided then it was time for an alternative media association in the South Pacific apart from PINA - and not in opposition to it -  to be established.

On 10 August a meeting was held in Apia, capital of Samoa, attended by media representatives from Hawaii, Cooks Islands, Samoa, Tonga, Australia, with internet linkup to others in Fiji, Vanuatu and Papua New Guinea.

On 12 August they duly formed a new regional media association and named it Pasifika Media Association (PasiMA). In Samoa, Pasima means "concrete fortress".

"It is where we intend to house press freedom so that we can promote, protect and defend it in there against dictatorial governments that are likely to emerge from around the South Pacific," the group said.

The writer was elected chairman of the board, publisher Kalafi Moala of Tonga was elected vice-chairman, and  John Woods was elected chairman/treasurer. PasiMA  has since been legally registered and is located in the premises of the Samoa Observer in Apia.

And just before we left for Vienna, we received word that the US Embassy's donation of US$10,000 for PasiMA's website has been received.

I repeat that there is no press freedom in Fiji today. However there is still press freedom in Samoa, Tonga, Cook Islands, Vanuatu and Papua New Guinea.

I also want to say that Fiji's problem cannot be solved by Bainimarama's media law and his racial and cultural reforms. Those problems can only be solved with democracy in place, and freedom of the press respected.

And lastly, I want to say that PasiMA will work hard to make sure press freedom is returned to the people of Fiji where it belongs. I say this knowing that tyrants come and go but press freedom remains.

* PasiMA vice-chair Kalafi Moala is the keynote speaker at the annual New Zealand-based Pacific Islands Media Association (PIMA) conference at AUT University in Auckland tomorrow.

* Comment on this item pmediawa@aut.ac.nz

+++niuswire

PACIFIC MEDIA WATCH ONLINE
www.pacmediawatch.aut.ac.nz

PACIFIC MEDIA WATCH is a media and educational resource compiled by the AUT Pacific Media Centre for the Pacific region.

(c)1996-2010 Creative Commons
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Items are provided solely for review purposes as a non-profit educational service. Copyright remains the property of the original  producers as indicated in the header. Recipients should seek permission
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of PMW or the Pacific Media Centre.

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Wednesday, September 29, 2010

[pima.nius] NZ: Media adviser calls for 'shift at top' in diversity decision making

11:47 AM |


Title – 7047 NZ:  Media adviser calls for 'shift at top' in diversity decision making
Date – 28 September 2010
Byline – Olivia Caldwell
Origin – Pacific Media Watch
Source – Pacific Scoop, 28/09/10
Copyright – PS
Status – Unabridged
----------------------------
* Pacific Media Watch Online - check the website for archive and links:
www.pacmediawatch.aut.ac.nz

* Post a comment on this story at PMW Right of Reply:
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MEDIA ADVISER CALLS FOR 'SHIFT AT TOP' IN DIVERSITY DECISION MAKING
http://pacific.scoop.co.nz/2010/09/media-adviser-calls-for-shift-at-top-in-diversity-decision-making/#more-10123

Journalism schools around New Zealand are recognising the need to offer specific education to diverse ethnic groups in order to attract them to the industry. AUT University is introducing the country's first Graduate Diploma in Pacific Journalism for next year.

By Olivia Caldwell

AUCKLAND (Pacific Scoop/Pacific Media Watch): When a Thai family's pain and anguish from the Christchurch earthquake was printed on the front page of the Dominion Post earlier this month, Asia New Zealand Foundation's media adviser Charles Mabbett was more than happy to read on.

Although Mabbett is sympathetic to the family's loss of their livelihood through their damaged restaurant, it was one of the few articles that he believes has displayed good ethnic reporting.

As a media officer for an organisation dedicated to building New Zealanders' knowledge and understanding of Asia, Mabbett takes notice of any media coverage the Asian community gets. He says that although he has seen improvements over the last 20 years there is still some way to go.

"We need to see a shift in decision making from up top. They pigeonhole these communities when they are a part of the wider community just like everyone else. We just need to have an increase in direction in newsrooms. They need to show that migrant communities are New Zealanders too."

Mabbett says that to include diverse ethnic training in journalism education is a "no brainer" and there is a need to develop cultural skills for young journalists.

Cultural and ethnic education within journalism schools is an issue loudly echoed by New Zealand Herald columnist Tapu Misa. She says at the very minimum, trainee journalists should be learning the basics of Maaori, Pacific Island and Asian cultures and that these elements should be compulsory in today's courses.

"We are a bicultural nation undeniably. There is not always one way of looking at things. If you don't learn this you are limited and you get left behind," she says.

More critical
"It is more critical than the likes of your short hand. There is the argument about specialisation, but when you are writing about housing, politics, where does it [cultural awareness] not come in?"

Misa says a quick fix of getting one Pacific Island or Maaori reporter into a newsroom to report on ethnic issues is not the answer. Improvements have to be made before entering the newsroom because "you can't understand the argument if you don't know the history".

She says the lack of cultural training does show in our mainstream media and they don't tend to cover ethnic issues as well as they could. She highlights newsroom composition and enthusiasm as factors for this, but says there is recognition that ethnic reporting is important, especially in Auckland.

"We have to reflect Auckland and we have to be proactive about it. You can't just do one story here and there, it has to be consistent. We have a big Pacific Island and Asian population so we must reflect it."

Looking at journalism courses across the country there are hints of cultural awareness training. AUT will next year begin its new Graduate Diploma in Pacific Journalism aimed at addressing the shortage of Pasifika journalists in New Zealand.

The university is currently recruiting a Pasifika journalist and educator to run this programme. It also hosts the annual Pacific Islands Media Association (PIMA) conference – the next one is on Friday – and sponsors two Pasifika communications scholarships a year.

Too general
Associate professor and director of AUT's Pacific Media Centre Dr David Robie says the objective of new diploma is to provide journalists with a greater understanding in reporting on the region and the issues because much journalism training is too general.

"While general journalism education provides the basic skill level, graduate and postgraduate journalism studies should be far more challenging and provide an environment where journalists are engaging critically with the industry and taking things to a new level."

With a background as an international news reporter and editor, Dr Robie believes New Zealand media rarely provide in-depth coverage of Asia-Pacific news.

"New Zealand news media are extremely insular and put very little effort into specialised international reporting. The Asia-Pacific reporting that is done is generally framed with a New Zealand angle. The result is very superficial and often ill-informed coverage. Our sporadic reporting of the South Pacific is a glaring example of this."

The PMC established Pacific Scoop website www.pacific.scoop.co.nz  in partnership with Scoop Media last year to boost Asia-Pacific reporting. Student journalists from Fiji, New Zealand and Papua New Guinea contribute along with a network of seasoned journalists.

Jim Tucker, ex journalist and now journalism educator at Whitireia, says a graduate diploma could be pitching a little high in terms of a remedy. He says these sorts of initiatives need to be twinned up with talent identification across schools and universities.

Tucker himself is a pioneer for recognising good ethnic reporting and so in 2007 he started the New Zealand Excellence in Reporting Diversity awards. He says that celebrating the good work that is done by reporters is important.

"These awards are just one way of taking to the attack of poor performance in ethnic reporting. I call it the Pollyanna approach, but I am optimistic that things will improve."

Mainstream underdone
He says that apart from one or two journalists, mainstream media in terms of diverse reporting is not done well enough.

"We only see these communities in mainstream news if they have done something wrong or if they're having a food festival. So we get this picture in our head that they are either full of crime or colourful people," he says.

"Advertising are thinking well ahead of editorial, we are seeing more than just white faces in advertising and our newsrooms still haven't caught up."

He says the biggest problem faced is within Auckland, as the news media here have not responded well in proportion with their ethnic population. He says that there is a commercial imperative that gets in the way, but to watch for changes because the media cannot ignore the fact that nearly 50 percent of the Auckland population has an ethnic background other than European.

Alan Samson, Massey University journalism lecturer and research associate for the Pacific Media Centre, says the economic argument in newsrooms is a difficult one. He says struggling newspapers generally report local news quite "fiercely" which is economically sensible, but they are frequently criticised for their poor international coverage.

"Personally, I don't [think the media cover of Asia Pacific news well enough].  We are good at covering coups and tsunami and Apec meetings, but otherwise vast tracts of the region are anonymous to us. That aside, generally, I think, things are being tackled in the right way – especially encouraging students to broaden their horizons."

Samson says all in all, diverse ethnic training within universities will benefit the entire industry because the emerging journalists coming through will have more knowledge and interest in Asia and the Pacific.

"Certainly there is a growing awareness of the importance of our near neighbours, culturally and economically.  And most of the big papers now have a pool of highly aware young reporters able to report on Pacific matters. Whether papers write enough about the Pacific and Asia, of course, is a different issue."

Olivia Caldwell is a Postgraduate Diploma in Communication Studies student on the Asia-Pacific Journalism course at AUT University.

* Comment on this item pmediawa@aut.ac.nz

+++niuswire

PACIFIC MEDIA WATCH ONLINE
www.pacmediawatch.aut.ac.nz

PACIFIC MEDIA WATCH is a media and educational resource compiled by the AUT Pacific Media Centre for the Pacific region.

(c)1996-2010 Creative Commons
http://creativecommons.org

Items are provided solely for review purposes as a non-profit educational service. Copyright remains the property of the original  producers as indicated in the header. Recipients should seek permission
from the copyright owner for any publishing. Copyright owners not  wishing their materials to be posted by PMW please contact us. The views expressed in material listed by PMW are not necessarily the views
of PMW or the Pacific Media Centre.

For further information or joining the Pacific Media Watch listserve, visit:
http://lists.apc.org.au/listinfo.cgi/pacific_media_watch?apc.org.au

Email:
pmc@aut.ac.nz
Fax: (+649) 921 9987
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[pima.nius] RELOCATED SAMOANS STRUGGLE FOR WATER

11:46 AM |

RELOCATED SAMOANS STRUGGLE FOR WATER
A year after tsunami, water service just a promise

By Charlina Tone
APIA, Samoa (Samoa Observer, Sept. 28, 2010) - After a few days without rain Olo Tolovae of Lepa sends his four daughters with buckets to the village pool to collect water.

The 30 minute walk can be very tiring so his daughters' reluctance to make the trip comes as no surprise.

The girls are still trying to adjust to this new lifestyle since relocating inland after the tsunami almost a year ago.

But Mr. Tolovae believes it's a small price to pay for guaranteed safety against another tidal wave.

"We desperately need running water here," he said. "It has been almost a year and still nothing, just endless promises that the water supply will reach us soon."

Living in Lepa, one of the worst hit villages, the family envy their neighbor's new tank placed in front of the house.

A water truck makes a weekly trip to families with tanks and refills them.

"Before I used to try and stop the truck to ask for some water but it always speeds by, so I don't try any more" said Mr. Tolovae.

He and his family also missed out on the new WS$18,000 [US$7,000] tsunami house that was promised to every family in the area.

"I don't know why we didn't get a new house like the other families," he said.

"When we first moved here right after the tsunami hit we collected junk from around to build our house, thinking it would be a temporary shelter until the aid arrived. But it still hasn't and after a year we are still living like this."

But the Tolovae's did receive WS$10,000 [US$4,000] that they used to purchase building materials.

We received that money recently and have started to buy iron roofing and posts to build a more civilised house," he said.

The family lost all their possessions in the tsunami.

About 500 metres away from the Tolovae's, Uini Poalaga is washing her dishes near the main road where the family's water tank is placed.

Her home is across the road, up on a small hill.

Washing the dishes is part of her daily routine. The family also use the same tank to get water for bathing, drinking and cooking.

"It's a hassle and is very inconvenient but there is no other way for us to get water," she said.

But Mrs. Poalaga is grateful for the tank because previously their situation was even worse.

"My children and I would have to walk down to the village pool and to our relatives along the coast to get water," she said.

The family has no intention of moving back near the coast for fear of another tsunami.

Fotu Siaosi, his wife Tuu and their five month old baby face a similar daily struggle.

The family has no water or electricity. Mr. Siaosi is unsure why his family was not given a water tank or a new house.

"We relocated too but were not given the same privileges as other families," he said.

"We built our own house and get water from a pool in our family down the road."

On the same access road further up in Saleapaga, Ulalia Fouina smiles at the sight of the water tank on the main road in front of the family house.

"We were so happy when we got that tank two months ago because before that getting water was a huge struggle," she said.

A year after the tsunami, families living on the access road from Lepa to Lalomanu are still without a proper water supply.

Most have no intention of moving back near the coast where water supply was not an issue.

"It is better to be safe than sorry," Mrs. Fouina said.

Samoa Observer:

www.samoaobserver.ws/
Copyright © 2010 Samoa Observer. All Rights Reserved

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Tuesday, September 28, 2010

[pima.nius] Coming up on Pacific Pulse

11:37 AM |


For immediate release
 
Pacific Pulse
one ocean – many stories
 
Pacific Pulse ventures beyond the headlines with feature stories from Polynesia, Melanesia and Micronesia that reflect contemporary life across the Pacific and recognise the strengths, hopes, achievements and aspirations of the region.
 
 
                 
 
 
Pacific Pulse will be broadcast across the Pacific in the following time zones:
 
 
Wed 29th Sept           19:50  American Samoa
                                Samoa  
                                Niue
                        20:50   Cook Islands
                                French Polynesia
 
Thu 30th Sept           15:50   Palau
                        16:50   Northern Marianas
                        17:50    Federated States of Micronesia         
                                New Caledonia  
                                Solomon Islands
                                Vanuatu
                        18:50   Fiji
                                Kiribati
                                Marshall Islands        
                                Nauru  
                                Tokelau
                                Tuvalu
                                Wallis and Futuna
                        19:50   Tonga  
                        20:50   Guam
                                Papua New Guinea
                                                               
 
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[pima.nius] FIJI: Daily Post still in dark about its future

11:36 AM |


Title – 7046 FIJI: Daily Post still in dark about its future
Date – 28 September 2010
Byline – Paradise Tabucala
Origin – Pacific Media Watch
Source – Fijivillage.com, 28/09/10
Copyright – FV
Status – Unabridged
----------------------------
* Pacific Media Watch Online - check the website for archive and links:
www.pacmediawatch.aut.ac.nz

* Post a comment on this story at PMW Right of Reply:
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FIJI DAILY POST STILL IN DARK
http://www.fijivillage.com/?mod=story&id=280910d54a0c38363e12b71cb11c8f

By Paradise Tabucala

SUVA (Fiji Village.com/Pacific Media Watch): As today marks the deadline for local media companies to ensure that they are 90 percent locally owned, one of Fiji's dailies, the Daily Post, reveals that they are still in the dark over the future of the company.

Fijivillage spoke with the editor-in-chief of the Daily Post, Robert Wolfgramm, who revealed that he is still in the dark as he has not been contacted by the publisher and major share holder, Australian Alan Hickling who is currently abroad.

Wolfgramm had earlier informed Fijivillage that all the employees have been sent home until further notice.

It is understood that the Fiji Daily Post last published in April this year.

Meanwhile, last week was the official handover of operations to the new owners of Fiji Times, the Motibhai group of companies.

Fiji Times was previously 100 percent owned by overseas parent company News Limited in Australia.

* Comment on this item pmediawa@aut.ac.nz

+++niuswire

PACIFIC MEDIA WATCH ONLINE
www.pacmediawatch.aut.ac.nz

PACIFIC MEDIA WATCH is a media and educational resource compiled by the AUT Pacific Media Centre for the Pacific region.

(c)1996-2010 Creative Commons
http://creativecommons.org

Items are provided solely for review purposes as a non-profit educational service. Copyright remains the property of the original  producers as indicated in the header. Recipients should seek permission
from the copyright owner for any publishing. Copyright owners not  wishing their materials to be posted by PMW please contact us. The views expressed in material listed by PMW are not necessarily the views
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For further information or joining the Pacific Media Watch listserve, visit:
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Email:
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Fax: (+649) 921 9987
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Pacific_media_watch@lists.apc.org.au


--
----------------------------------------
pacific islands media association
pima.nius@gmail.com
aotearoa, new zealand
----------------------------------------
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[pima.nius] Pacific leaders raise global security concerns at UN

11:28 AM |

Pacific leaders raise global security concerns at UN

http://www.radioaustralia.net.au/pacbeat/stories/201009/s3024281.htm

Updated September 28, 2010 17:38:23

The 65th meeting of the United Nations General Assembly is continuing in New York with Pacific island leaders raising concerns over global security. Last week, the Pacific Island delegations used their addresses to call for urgent action on an agreement to tackle climate change. Those calls were echoed by the leaders of Papua New Guinea, Fiji, Vanuatu and Samoa.

But, they also broached a far more diverse range of topics, including threats to world security. Samoa's Prime Minister, Tuilaepa Sailele, warned that climate change could cause more international conflict, but also called for greater cross-border co-operation to tackle terrorism.

Presenter: Helene Hofman
Speakers: Prime Minister Sir Michael Somare of Papua New Guinea; Prime Minister Tuilaepa Sailele of Samoa; Prime Minister Edward Natapei of Vanuatu

--
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pacific islands media association
pima.nius@gmail.com
aotearoa, new zealand
----------------------------------------
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Monday, September 27, 2010

[pima.nius] Pacific Island Media Association 2010 Conference Programme

1:53 PM |

Kia Orana, Talofa lava, Malo e lelei, Fakalofa lahi atu, Ni Sa Bula Vinaka, Taloha Ni and Warm Pacific Greetings.

2010 brings a new era for the Pacific Island Media Association but what does that mean for Pacific media practitioners and students? At this year's conference (Friday 1st October at AUT in Auckland), topics include media standards when reporting, the future of traditional media and the delivery of information via the internet and social marketing. We also look at how to make your own news with cost effective and accessible technology, script writing and how to keep up with changes in journalism.  The discussions will be led by a range of Pacific media experts, offering critical analysis and challenging the status quo.

 

 

PROGRAMME


OPENING - 9.00 am

 

Opening Prayer - Pastor Lui Ponifasio (3 mins)


Welcome - Tagaloatele Dr Peggy Dunlop – AUT (5 mins)

 

PIMA Chairman – Iulia Leilua (5 mins)

 

 

OPENING ADDRESS - 9.15 am

 

Kalafi Moala – Vice Chair PasiMa (25 mins)


One of the driving forces behind the Pacific's new media freedom group, PasiMA is the keynote speaker at this year's conference.  Kalafi Moala, publisher and CEO of Tonga's Taimi Media Network, is the new vice chair of PasiMA, an organisation which has reportedly created a rift with PINA (the Pacific Island News Association organisation based in Fiji), a similar organisation formed in 1972. 

The Pacific region is a political, social and cultural hotspot which doesn't make reporting an easy assignment.  So why is there a need for a second media freedom group when there are a limited number of journalists and funding?  What will this new group achieve and what can they offer Pacific journalists in New Zealand?

 

Kalafi Moala launched Tonga's first independent newspaper, the Taimi 'o Tonga, in 1989. He is the CEO of the Taimi Media Network (TMN) in Tonga which publishes the Taimi 'o Tonga (published twice weekly), the English language Tonga Chronicle (published weekly), and operates TMN-TV2 broadcast for 6 hours daily on Digicel TV, and the 24 hr Radio FM 88.1.

 

Question and answer time – 15 minutes

 

 

MORNING WORKSHOPS (NB 3 workshops will run simultaneously from

10.00 – 11.30am)

 

**WORKSHOP 1 - 10.00 – 11.30 am
Scriptwriters and Directors Workshop: Finding Your Mojo

Facilitator – TBC

 

Jumpstart your scriptwriting skills with three of the Pacific's most talented film/TV writers and directors.  Got a project you can't start or finish?  Need a push in the right direction?  Our trio can help you with:

  • Writing - brainstorm ideas, develop characters and write crackling storylines
  • Directing – learn the basics of becoming a successful TV and film director. 
  • Telling a story – what makes a compelling, interesting and successful story?
  • Injecting passion into your work

 

It's an hour and a half of fun, creativity and throwing around ideas no matter the size, scope or silliness!

Participating Pacific film makers, story tellers and representative from Playmarket - Shimpal Lelisi, Oscar Keightley and Damon Fepulea'i share their experiences of working in the film and TV industries. Shimpal is a Niuean-born actor and TV presenter, best known as one of the members of the Naked Samoans and Bro'Town team.  Oscar Vai To'elau Kightley, MNZM, is a Samoan-born actor, television presenter and writer.  He's also a member of the Naked Samoans and Bro'Town team.  Damon Fepulea'i's film directing credits include 'Watermark', 'The Market' and 'Jono's New Show'.  Jenni Heka coordinates Playmarket's now significant development programme for Maori and Pacific Island playwrights in the Auckland region, networking between playwrights, producers, practitioners and the world at large. 

 

**WORKSHOP 2 - 10.00 – 11.30 am

D.I.Y Multimedia

Facilitators – Randwick Park School students with Sala'a and Sina Lologa

 

Here's something different.  Find out what young people are doing with technology – from young people themselves!  Students and their tutors from Randwick Park School will teach you how to make a podcast, your own blog page or a simple music video clip shot on your cell phone.  Imagine that.  Take images, edit them then post your content online.


Bring your own camera and if you've got one, an Apple Macbook.  If you've got Apple
gears like iPhones, iPods or iBooks, they can also teach you how to use these applications on your laptop.

 

Sala'a Lologa is an Information Communication Technology Co-ordinator at Randwick Park School in Manurewa.  Sina Lologa is also a teacher who uses I.C.T. as a teaching tool.   

 


**WORKSHOP 3
- 10.00 – 11.30 am

Media standards and the clash with Pacific cultural standards

Facilitator – Sandra Kailahi

 

What happens when you turn up to report a criminal case, only to find your relative on trial and the family pressuring you to write a certain way?  What about when your Palagi boss sends you to report on an explosive story that's going to reflect badly on a Pacific community or person?  Who is responsible for the racist backlash and national furore after you've broken the story?

 

Your Pacific heritage may help open Pacific doors but it also brings certain pressures and responsibilities other journalists don't have to face.  Cultural expectations and professional ethics don't always go hand in hand in Pacific journalism.  Take name suppression for example, how do you keep a big story quiet in the Pacific communities? And when does a public good become a public bad. We ask a panel of professional Pacific journalists to discuss the theory behind delivering a story while facing cultural restrictions and potential consequences.

 

Panel: Vaimoana Tapaleao - NZ Herald (2010 Qantas Junior Reporter of the Year); Richard Pamatatau – Radio New Zealand; Niva Retimanu – Newstalk ZB, Radio New Zealand.

 

 

Friday: 11.30 am – 12.00 pm

ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING/SCHOLARSHIP STUDENTS

PIMA will hold its AGM before lunch.  All paid members are invited to attend. A year's membership only costs $20.  Membership forms can be downloaded from our website www.pima.co.nz or at the end of this document.  At the AGM we will discuss matters arising from the last conference AGM and the election of the new PIMA executive.

 


LUNCH - 12.00 pm

 


12.50 pm PMC – Dr David Robie

 

Dr David Robie will give an update on the Pacific Media Centre - TE AMOKURA.  It's the only media research and community resource centre of its kind in Aotearoa/New Zealand and has a strategic focus on Māori, Pasifika and ethnic diversity media and community development. It was established by AUT University's Faculty of Design and Creative Technologies in 2007.

 

 

1.00 -2.30 pm – Choice of 3 workshops

 

***WORKSHOP 1

Producers' Workshop: Getting your story idea onto the screen.

Facilitator – TBC

 

Submitting a programme/film proposal to broadcasters and funders can be hard work.  It's not good enough to have a good idea, you have to SELL it to them.  Which means you have to know how to sell it and what will make your proposal stand out from the pack. Our team of industry experts will discuss:

  • What makes an idea sexy and what turns decision makers off
  • The importance of timing when submitting a funding proposal (funding rounds, events, financial years, anniversaries etc)
  • How to ensure your project gets read, and more importantly produced
  • How to schmooze to the right people at the right events
  • The types of Pacific stories they're interested in
  • What to do when your idea is turned down.  Do you give up or carry on?
  • The influence of the internet - is this the way of future story telling?

 

This will be an interactive session with time for questions and answers from the floor.


Panel: Maori Television's Head of Acquisitions and Commissioning, Manutai Schuster; TVNZ
Commissioner Drama and Scripted Comedy - Kathleen Anderson;  TVNZ Commissioner for Factual Entertainment, Children's, and Maori and Pacific, Kathryn Graham; New Zealand Film Commission Development Executive, Chris Payne

 

 

**WORKSHOP 2

D.I.Y Multimedia continued…….

Facilitators – Randwick Park School students with Sala'a and Sina Lologa

 

Here's something different.  Find out what young people are doing with technology – from young people themselves!  Students and their tutors from Randwick Park School will teach you how to make a podcast, your own blog page or a simple music video clip shot on your cell phone.  Imagine that.  Take images, edit them then post your content online.



**WORKSHOP 3

Get Your Game On with New Era Media

Facilitator – Cam Swainson

 

Only the quick survive in the fast changing world of multi-media platforms – the combination of text, audio, still images, animation, video, and interactivity content forms, and the convergence of media, entertainment, the internet and phone.

It's not enough to post a video or information online.  You have to make sure people see it, and if required, take up the call to action.  If you're in a competitive industry, you need competitive advantage.

 

It's not as complicated as it sounds – a few cookies placed here, a few links on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube there.  But it has to be a co-ordinated approach and not scattergun.

 

In this PIMA workshop, TVNZ's multi-media guru, Cam Swainson, will teach you basic strategies such as:

 

  • Using multiple platforms to reach larger audiences for your stories, or media outlet.
  • The 360 degrees approach: wrapping an array of multi-media options around your vision to achieve successful results
  • Practical examples of new era media applications in Pacific Island contexts
  • Using multi media to help increase revenue and give more bang for buck
  • How to "go viral" i.e. become popular on the internet in a short amount of time
  • Insights into future trends in mobiles, apps, broadband


Cam Swainson-Whaanga is currently a researcher and multi-media person for Tagata Pasifika at TVNZ. Cam has previously been a Director for I AM TV, Mai Time and Production Manager for such shows as Dancing with the Stars and Mitre 10 Dream Home. Cam is involved in many Pacific initiatives and projects around education and media.  "Even with my Maori background, I feel we are all Polynesians and I see a lot of similarities between Pacific and Maori cultures and they generally share similar struggles in the 21st century. I see my role as helping get the Pacific stories we produce, across the world via online and social network sites."

 

 

Friday 2.45 – 4.30pm

PANEL DISCUSSION – THE END OF TRADITIONAL MEDIA

Facilitator – John Utanga

 

Over the last decade we have seen the biggest shift in technology since the industrial revolution.  The impact on traditional media has been huge with many newspapers struggling to compete with online media and radio stations going online to reach bigger audiences.

 

Media commentators blame the decline of traditional media on the recession, proliferation of media, digital convergence and media fragmentation.

 

But could the decline of traditional media be good for Pacific peoples?  Social media is the great equaliser.  There are few places where diversity rules as much as it does on the internet.  Tribalisation on the internet reflects the tribal/communal nature of Pacific cultures.


Online social interaction is wide open to almost everyone, regardless of income, social background, ethnicity or gender identity. Everyone's voice can be heard and potentially make a difference. Social media is the voice of Everyman.

 

How are Pacific media capitalising on that tribalism?  Does quality journalism matter now when so many voices can be heard.  Could it be the death knell for the written word as we know it but a new era for radio and television – a good thing for Pacific cultures who traditionally passed on knowledge through aural and visual communication.

 

Panel: Vienna Richards – PacificEyeWitness.com; Tom Etuata – Chief Executive Pacific Media Network; Setita Miller – Pasifika Broadcasting; Sefita Hao'uli – Tongan media veteran; Kalafi Moala – Taimi Media Network; Taualeo'o Stephen Stehlin – Tagata Pasifika

 

4.30pm - Networking

Vespa Bar – AUT Campus

 

 

Sponsors

PIMA acknowledges the support of the following organisations for helping to make this conference a reality.

 

AUT – www.aut.ac.nz

Ministry of Pacific Islands Affairs – www.minpac.org.nz
Pacific Media Centre www.pmc.ac.nz

--
----------------------------------------
pacific islands media association
pima.nius@gmail.com
aotearoa, new zealand
----------------------------------------
The pima.nius googlegroup is a facility for discussion and distributing information. Content sent by this googlegroup are forwarded from various networks and media publications.
 
DISCLAIMER: These emails are unedited and discussions made through this googlegroup are unmoderated. Announcements made through this googlegroup do not constitute endorsement for the organisations, individuals or opinions featured. Please check the integrity of organisations and individuals before exchanging personal information with them.
 
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comment here:
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[pima.nius] Pacific Island Media Association 2010 Conference Programme

1:37 PM |

Kia Orana, Talofa lava, Malo e lelei, Fakalofa lahi atu, Ni Sa Bula Vinaka, Taloha Ni and Warm Pacific Greetings.

2010 brings a new era for the Pacific Island Media Association but what does that mean for Pacific media practitioners and students? At this year's conference Friday 1st October at AUT in Auckland), topics include media standards when reporting, the future of traditional media and the delivery of information via the internet and social marketing. We also look at how to make your own news with cost effective and accessible technology, script writing and how to keep up with changes in journalism.  The discussions will be led by a range of Pacific media experts, offering critical analysis and challenging the status quo.

 

 

PROGRAMME


OPENING - 9.00 am

 

Opening Prayer - Pastor Lui Ponifasio (3 mins)


Welcome - Tagaloatele Dr Peggy Dunlop – AUT (5 mins)

 

PIMA Chairman – Iulia Leilua (5 mins)

 

 

OPENING ADDRESS - 9.15 am

 

Kalafi Moala – Vice Chair PasiMa (25 mins)


One of the driving forces behind the Pacific's new media freedom group, PasiMA is the keynote speaker at this year's conference.  Kalafi Moala, publisher and CEO of Tonga's Taimi Media Network, is the new vice chair of PasiMA, an organisation which has reportedly created a rift with PINA (the Pacific Island News Association organisation based in Fiji), a similar organisation formed in 1972. 

The Pacific region is a political, social and cultural hotspot which doesn't make reporting an easy assignment.  So why is there a need for a second media freedom group when there are a limited number of journalists and funding?  What will this new group achieve and what can they offer Pacific journalists in New Zealand?

 

Kalafi Moala launched Tonga's first independent newspaper, the Taimi 'o Tonga, in 1989. He is the CEO of the Taimi Media Network (TMN) in Tonga which publishes the Taimi 'o Tonga (published twice weekly), the English language Tonga Chronicle (published weekly), and operates TMN-TV2 broadcast for 6 hours daily on Digicel TV, and the 24 hr Radio FM 88.1.

 

Question and answer time – 15 minutes

 

 

MORNING WORKSHOPS (NB 3 workshops will run simultaneously from

10.00 – 11.30am)

 

**WORKSHOP 1 - 10.00 – 11.30 am
Scriptwriters and Directors Workshop: Finding Your Mojo

Facilitator – TBC

 

Jumpstart your scriptwriting skills with three of the Pacific's most talented film/TV writers and directors.  Got a project you can't start or finish?  Need a push in the right direction?  Our trio can help you with:

  • Writing - brainstorm ideas, develop characters and write crackling storylines
  • Directing – learn the basics of becoming a successful TV and film director. 
  • Telling a story – what makes a compelling, interesting and successful story?
  • Injecting passion into your work

 

It's an hour and a half of fun, creativity and throwing around ideas no matter the size, scope or silliness!

Participating Pacific film makers, story tellers and representative from Playmarket - Shimpal Lelisi, Oscar Keightley and Damon Fepulea'i share their experiences of working in the film and TV industries. Shimpal is a Niuean-born actor and TV presenter, best known as one of the members of the Naked Samoans and Bro'Town team.  Oscar Vai To'elau Kightley, MNZM, is a Samoan-born actor, television presenter and writer.  He's also a member of the Naked Samoans and Bro'Town team.  Damon Fepulea'i's film directing credits include 'Watermark', 'The Market' and 'Jono's New Show'.  Jenni Heka coordinates Playmarket's now significant development programme for Maori and Pacific Island playwrights in the Auckland region, networking between playwrights, producers, practitioners and the world at large. 

 

**WORKSHOP 2 - 10.00 – 11.30 am

D.I.Y Multimedia

Facilitators – Randwick Park School students with Sala'a and Sina Lologa

 

Here's something different.  Find out what young people are doing with technology – from young people themselves!  Students and their tutors from Randwick Park School will teach you how to make a podcast, your own blog page or a simple music video clip shot on your cell phone.  Imagine that.  Take images, edit them then post your content online.


Bring your own camera and if you've got one, an Apple Macbook.  If you've got Apple
gears like iPhones, iPods or iBooks, they can also teach you how to use these applications on your laptop.

 

Sala'a Lologa is an Information Communication Technology Co-ordinator at Randwick Park School in Manurewa.  Sina Lologa is also a teacher who uses I.C.T. as a teaching tool.   

 


**WORKSHOP 3
- 10.00 – 11.30 am

Media standards and the clash with Pacific cultural standards

Facilitator – Sandra Kailahi

 

What happens when you turn up to report a criminal case, only to find your relative on trial and the family pressuring you to write a certain way?  What about when your Palagi boss sends you to report on an explosive story that's going to reflect badly on a Pacific community or person?  Who is responsible for the racist backlash and national furore after you've broken the story?

 

Your Pacific heritage may help open Pacific doors but it also brings certain pressures and responsibilities other journalists don't have to face.  Cultural expectations and professional ethics don't always go hand in hand in Pacific journalism.  Take name suppression for example, how do you keep a big story quiet in the Pacific communities? And when does a public good become a public bad. We ask a panel of professional Pacific journalists to discuss the theory behind delivering a story while facing cultural restrictions and potential consequences.

 

Panel: Vaimoana Tapaleao - NZ Herald (2010 Qantas Junior Reporter of the Year); Richard Pamatatau – Radio New Zealand; Niva Retimanu – Newstalk ZB, Radio New Zealand.

 

 

Friday: 11.30 am – 12.00 pm

ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING/SCHOLARSHIP STUDENTS

PIMA will hold its AGM before lunch.  All paid members are invited to attend. A year's membership only costs $20.  Membership forms can be downloaded from our website www.pima.co.nz or at the end of this document.  At the AGM we will discuss matters arising from the last conference AGM and the election of the new PIMA executive.

 


LUNCH - 12.00 pm

 


12.50 pm PMC – Dr David Robie

 

Dr David Robie will give an update on the Pacific Media Centre - TE AMOKURA.  It's the only media research and community resource centre of its kind in Aotearoa/New Zealand and has a strategic focus on Māori, Pasifika and ethnic diversity media and community development. It was established by AUT University's Faculty of Design and Creative Technologies in 2007.

 

 

1.00 -2.30 pm – Choice of 3 workshops

 

***WORKSHOP 1

Producers' Workshop: Getting your story idea onto the screen.

Facilitator – TBC

 

Submitting a programme/film proposal to broadcasters and funders can be hard work.  It's not good enough to have a good idea, you have to SELL it to them.  Which means you have to know how to sell it and what will make your proposal stand out from the pack. Our team of industry experts will discuss:

  • What makes an idea sexy and what turns decision makers off
  • The importance of timing when submitting a funding proposal (funding rounds, events, financial years, anniversaries etc)
  • How to ensure your project gets read, and more importantly produced
  • How to schmooze to the right people at the right events
  • The types of Pacific stories they're interested in
  • What to do when your idea is turned down.  Do you give up or carry on?
  • The influence of the internet - is this the way of future story telling?

 

This will be an interactive session with time for questions and answers from the floor.


Panel: Maori Television's Head of Acquisitions and Commissioning, Manutai Schuster; TVNZ
Commissioner Drama and Scripted Comedy - Kathleen Anderson;  TVNZ Commissioner for Factual Entertainment, Children's, and Maori and Pacific, Kathryn Graham; New Zealand Film Commission Development Executive, Chris Payne

 

 

**WORKSHOP 2

D.I.Y Multimedia continued…….

Facilitators – Randwick Park School students with Sala'a and Sina Lologa

 

Here's something different.  Find out what young people are doing with technology – from young people themselves!  Students and their tutors from Randwick Park School will teach you how to make a podcast, your own blog page or a simple music video clip shot on your cell phone.  Imagine that.  Take images, edit them then post your content online.



**WORKSHOP 3

Get Your Game On with New Era Media

Facilitator – Cam Swainson

 

Only the quick survive in the fast changing world of multi-media platforms – the combination of text, audio, still images, animation, video, and interactivity content forms, and the convergence of media, entertainment, the internet and phone.

It's not enough to post a video or information online.  You have to make sure people see it, and if required, take up the call to action.  If you're in a competitive industry, you need competitive advantage.

 

It's not as complicated as it sounds – a few cookies placed here, a few links on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube there.  But it has to be a co-ordinated approach and not scattergun.

 

In this PIMA workshop, TVNZ's multi-media guru, Cam Swainson, will teach you basic strategies such as:

 

  • Using multiple platforms to reach larger audiences for your stories, or media outlet.
  • The 360 degrees approach: wrapping an array of multi-media options around your vision to achieve successful results
  • Practical examples of new era media applications in Pacific Island contexts
  • Using multi media to help increase revenue and give more bang for buck
  • How to "go viral" i.e. become popular on the internet in a short amount of time
  • Insights into future trends in mobiles, apps, broadband


Cam Swainson-Whaanga is currently a researcher and multi-media person for Tagata Pasifika at TVNZ. Cam has previously been a Director for I AM TV, Mai Time and Production Manager for such shows as Dancing with the Stars and Mitre 10 Dream Home. Cam is involved in many Pacific initiatives and projects around education and media.  "Even with my Maori background, I feel we are all Polynesians and I see a lot of similarities between Pacific and Maori cultures and they generally share similar struggles in the 21st century. I see my role as helping get the Pacific stories we produce, across the world via online and social network sites."

 

 

Friday 2.45 – 4.30pm

PANEL DISCUSSION – THE END OF TRADITIONAL MEDIA

Facilitator – John Utanga

 

Over the last decade we have seen the biggest shift in technology since the industrial revolution.  The impact on traditional media has been huge with many newspapers struggling to compete with online media and radio stations going online to reach bigger audiences.

 

Media commentators blame the decline of traditional media on the recession, proliferation of media, digital convergence and media fragmentation.

 

But could the decline of traditional media be good for Pacific peoples?  Social media is the great equaliser.  There are few places where diversity rules as much as it does on the internet.  Tribalisation on the internet reflects the tribal/communal nature of Pacific cultures.


Online social interaction is wide open to almost everyone, regardless of income, social background, ethnicity or gender identity. Everyone's voice can be heard and potentially make a difference. Social media is the voice of Everyman.

 

How are Pacific media capitalising on that tribalism?  Does quality journalism matter now when so many voices can be heard.  Could it be the death knell for the written word as we know it but a new era for radio and television – a good thing for Pacific cultures who traditionally passed on knowledge through aural and visual communication.

 

Panel: Vienna Richards – PacificEyeWitness.com; Tom Etuata – Chief Executive Pacific Media Network; Setita Miller – Pasifika Broadcasting; Sefita Hao'uli – Tongan media veteran; Kalafi Moala – Taimi Media Network; Taualeo'o Stephen Stehlin – Tagata Pasifika

 

4.30pm - Networking

Vespa Bar – AUT Campus

 

Sponsors

PIMA acknowledges the support of the following organisations for helping to make this conference a reality.

 

AUT – www.aut.ac.nz

Ministry of Pacific Islands Affairs – www.minpac.org.nz
Pacific Media Centre www.pmc.ac.nz

--
----------------------------------------
pacific islands media association
pima.nius@gmail.com
aotearoa, new zealand
----------------------------------------
The pima.nius googlegroup is a facility for discussion and distributing information. Content sent by this googlegroup are forwarded from various networks and media publications.
 
DISCLAIMER: These emails are unedited and discussions made through this googlegroup are unmoderated. Announcements made through this googlegroup do not constitute endorsement for the organisations, individuals or opinions featured. Please check the integrity of organisations and individuals before exchanging personal information with them.
 
- - - - - - - - -
comment here:
http://groups.google.com/group/pima-nius/topics?hl=en
 
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unsubscribe:
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