Sunday, October 31, 2010

[pima.nius] SPC PRESS RELEASE: SPC will be a 'larger organisation' in 2011

12:59 PM |



SPC will be a 'larger organisation' in 2011

Secretariat of the Pacific Community (SPC), Thursday, 28 Oct. 2010 In January 2011, the Secretariat of the Pacific Community (SPC) will be a larger organisation with more staff and additional programmes, according to its Director-General, Dr Jimmie Rodgers.

'SPC is about three key development outcomes – sustainable human development, sustainable natural resources management and development and sustainable economic development. These are also our key result areas,' he said.

Dr Rodgers was speaking at the opening of the 40th meeting of the Committee of Representatives of Governments and Administrations (CRGA – SPC's governing body) at SPC headquarters in Noumea, New Caledonia.  Representatives from 24 of SPC's 26 members are attending the meeting, which runs from 25 to 29 October 2010 and covers issues that are of high priority for Pacific Island countries and territories, including agriculture, aquaculture, culture, fisheries, forestry, gender, ICT, human rights, maritime transport, Pacific Legislatures for Population and Governance, public health, statistics and demography, youth and cross-cutting areas including food security and climate change.  SPC leads regional initiatives in many of these sectors in partnership with other regional and international organisations.

SPC will expand significantly in January 2011 with the full integration of two of these regional organisations: the Pacific Islands Applied Geoscience Commission (SOPAC) and the South Pacific Board for Educational Assessment (SPBEA), which initially merged with SPC as a stand-alone programme at the start of 2010. The move of the two organisations to SPC is the result of decisions made by Pacific Forum leaders to reform the regional institutional framework with a view to achieving greater efficiency and effectiveness in delivering services to members.

SPC members, many of whom are also members of SOPAC and SPBEA, stressed the importance of the work of both organisations to Pacific Island countries and territories as they welcomed them to their new home in SPC.

SPBEA and SOPAC are both based in Suva, Fiji Islands, increasing the number of SPC staff based in Fiji to more than half (360) of SPC's 600 staff in 2011. Noumea has just over 200 staff, while remaining staff are based in the North Pacific regional office in Pohnpei, Federated States of Micronesia, smaller country offices in Solomon Islands and Vanuatu and field operations in 10 other island countries.

Dr Rodgers said that 2011 would be a crucial year for SPC in ensuring that its expansion in terms of programmes and staff was supported by strong capability in planning, financial management, human resources, administration, legal issues, programme support, ICT and change management.

He highlighted the following milestones for 2011: continued full and effective delivery of all existing SPC services as well as the services transferring to SPC from SOPAC, SPBEA and the Pacific Islands Forum Secretariat; optimal corporate, programme support and ICT services to support the expanded organisation; finalisation of the long-term sustainable financing strategy; review and updating of the organisation's legal and strategic documents – the Tahiti Nui declaration and the SPC corporate plan; and strengthening the organisation's resilience, its 'engine room' and its strategic engagement, policy and planning facility.

The Director-General expressed appreciation for the continued support of members and development partners in providing funding for the work of SPC, saying that the spirit of partnership doubled the value of the efforts of every organisation. In this regard, he noted the success of the joint country strategies that are developed between SPC and its member countries and territories to ensure that members' priorities are addressed in a way that meets their individual needs. A major development in 2010 was the decision by the Council of Regional Organisations in the Pacific (CROP) to produce 'all CROP' joint country strategies with members as a tool for improving coordination of the services delivered by all participating CROP agencies to each member

The CRGA meeting, which ends on Friday, has a packed agenda that includes presentations by members on the impact of SPC's work in their country or territory.

'SPC is a complex organisation operating in several countries with staff from throughout the region and all corners of the globe,' said Dr Rodgers, 'but size doesn't mean we're out of touch. In fact, one of our strengths is our ability to take a cross-cutting approach to issues like energy, for example, which affects every aspect of economic and social development.'

'In the end, SPC is united by one main aim – to make a difference to the lives of Pacific Island people.'

For further information, visit SPC's website: www.spc.int.

Ends

 

High resolution photographs are available from SPC (email Carla@spc.int).

 


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[pima.nius] US Secretary of State seeks regional re-engagement

12:52 PM |

US Secretary of State seeks regional re-engagement

Updated October 29, 2010 17:04:47

On the eve of her two-week trip to the Asia Pacific region, the US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, has committed the Obama administration to a continuing re-engagement with the Pacific.

While most of the trip will be focused on Asia, Australia and New Zealand, Ms Clinton will also stopover in Papua New Guinea, a visit which is seen as an indication the US, wants to remain an influence there, and across the South Pacific.

But the trip is also being seen as a sign that the US wants to divert some of the support Pacific island nations have been giving to China.

Presenter: Pacific Correspondent Campbell Cooney
Speakers: Hillary Clinton, US Secretary of State; Fergus Hanson, Research Fellow at the Lowy Institute for International Policy

COONEY: Speaking to the East West Centre in Hawaii, the US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton laid out her travel agenda for the next fortnight.

CLINTON: From Hawaii it will be on to Guam and then Vietnam and Cambodia, then Malaysia and Papua New Guinea, New Zealand, Australia and American Samoa.

COONEY: The trip has been described as an Asia Pacific tour.

But the economic importance and strategic ties the US has, and wants to boost in Asia, means the Pacific, is only playing a minor part in this trip, and in her 30 minute presentation in Hawaii, there was really only one reference to the South Pacific.

CLINTON: We are working through the Pacific Islands Forum to support the Pacific Island nations as they strive to really confront and solve the challenges they face from climate change to freedom of navigation. And to that end I am pleased to announce that US aid will return to the Pacific next year, opening an office in Fiji with a fund of 21 million dollars to support climate change mitigation.

COONEY: But Ms Clinton's tour does include a stopover in Papua New Guinea, and Research Fellow at the Lowy Institute for International Policy, Fergus Hanson, says that's a clear sign that the US reengagement with the Pacific, which began around seven years ago, is still a focus for US Foreign Policy.

HANSON: It's quite a big deal for the Secretary of State to drop into Papua New Guinea.

COONEY: Over the past few years in the Pacific region, China, and to a certain degree India, have grown in influence.

In her address to the East West Centre Secretary Clinton did not attack either of the growing superpowers, but neither did she ignore them.

CLINTON: Their simultaneous rise is reshaping the world, and our ability to cooperative effectively with these two countries will be a critical test of our leadership.

COONEY: Fergus Hanson from the Lowy Institute says while the US wants to work with both countries, for China in particular, it is also competing for influence.

HANSON: There's no doubt that China has been stepping up its engagement in the region quite dramatically in the last five years or so. So I think that that has caused countries to reassess their positions in the Pacific and take another look at China's activities in the region.

COONEY: But in competing for diplomatic influence, Hillary Clinton says the USA has an ace up its sleeve.

CLINTON: More than our military might and more than the size of our economy, our most precious asset as a nation is the persuasive power of our values. In particular our steadfast belief in democracy and human rights. Our commitment to uphold and project these values is an indispensable aspect of our national character, and it is one of the best and most important contributions we offer the world. So of course it is an essential element of everything we do in US foreign policy.

COONEY: Mr Hanson agrees.

HANSON: There's things that the United States can offer like lifestyle, university, a whole range of soft power factors like its ideals and what it stands for. Where the countries in the region have evolved their political systems and the type of structures that they have in place and institutions, a lot of them tend to be very much aligned much more closely with countries like Australia and New Zealand, the United States.

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[pima.nius] King of Tonga's property sale hushed

12:47 PM |

King of Tonga's property sale hushed

NZPA
Last updated 21:36 29/10/2010

http://www.stuff.co.nz/dominion-post/news/world/4288946/King-of-Tongas-property-sale-hushed

Tenders have closed for potential buyers of the King of Tonga's Auckland residence, but the solicitor dealing with the sale is refusing to say how much interest there is in the house.

Tenders for Atalanga, the 1.6ha estate in St Andrews Road, Epsom, closed at 4pm yesterday, though it is subject to a caveat by some Tongan campaigners.

When contacted by NZPA today, Bayleys Real Estate said all media inquiries were being directed to solicitor Nick Fisher.

But when Mr Fisher was asked about buyer interest in the property, he asked a number of questions about the reporter's finances before saying "I don't need to discuss the King's personal business, thank you very much" and hung up the phone.

Some lawyers in Tonga dispute whether the sale is solely the King's business, saying taxpayers had contributed to its upkeep and may in fact own the property.

Speaking from Tonga, Auckland-based lawyer Sione Fonua yesterday said no documents had been produced which proved the late Queen Salote bought the house with her own money rather than public funds.

"If it was a personal property of the royal family then they can dispose of it as they please, as the constitution of Tonga states.

"However, the constitution also states that if the property was built by the government of Tonga then it will go to his heirs and successors so he cannot dispose of the property as he pleases."

Mr Fonua said today that a caveat on the house would remain in place until the end of next week.

Another Tongan lawyer, Joel Fotu, earlier told NZPA that Tongan taxpayers were paying the annual $28,000 bill for the property's upkeep.

Both Queen Salote and her son King Taufa'ahau Tupou IV spent their last days at the property.

Bayleys said on its website that the estate could be used for a prime residence or two, residential apartments, a retirement village or for a community group. 

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Thursday, October 28, 2010

[pima.nius] ***Taking Pasifika into the newsroom

5:11 PM |

***Taking Pasifika into the newsroom

AUT University's new one-year Graduate Diploma in Pacific Journalism, which aims to address the shortage of Pasifika journalists and communications people in New Zealand, is gearing up for its first batch of students in 2011.
The diploma is aimed at:

  • Working journalists seeking a media qualification
  • Working communications specialists in ministries, departments and NGOs seeking a qualification
  • People with a degree in another field wishing to make a change into journalism or communications careers
  • Regional Pacific Islands journalists seeking a professional New Zealand media qualification

As a new diversity initiative, this course has already attracted support from people in the media industry and has been backed by the Pacific Islands Media Association (PIMA). 

 

Also, this new programme counts for the AUT/PIMA Pasifika Communications Scholarship.

* School leavers still enter the journalism programme through the three-year Bachelor of Communication Studies course, majoring in journalism, radio or television.

For more information: David Robie, Director - Pacific Media Centre, AUT University
david.robie@aut.ac.nz

Course administrator: Farzana Alladin farzana.alladin@aut.ac.nzCourse information and brochure: www.aut.ac.nz/study-at-aut/study areas/communications/qualifications/undergraduate-degrees/graduate-diploma-in-pacific-journalism

Scholarship criteria and applications: www.aut.ac.nz/study-at-aut/fees,-scholarships-and-finance/scholarships/current-aut-scholarships/design-and-creative-technologies

AUT website story: www.aut.ac.nz/news/aut-news/2010/august/taking-multicultural-new-zealand-into-the-newsroom

Go to Pacific Scoop story

 

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[pima.nius] Forum Economic Ministers urged to take action on jobs

2:17 PM |

Forum Economic Ministers urged to take action on jobs

Updated October 28, 2010 17:39:16

Pacific Island Finance Ministers have been told economic growth in the region can be doubled and they need to take action to increase job opportunities.

The Ministers are in Niue for the annual Forum Economic Ministers Meeting.

Forum Secretary General, Tuiloma Neroni Slade, warned the meeting that the small amount of economic growth that is happening in the Pacific at the moment, is taking place without any growth in the number of jobs.

Tonga's Former Finance Minister, Siosiua 'Utoikamanu, now a consultant with the Asian Development Bank, gave the keynote address to the Ministers.

Presenter: Jemima Garrett
Speaker: Tonga's Former Finance Minister, Siosiua 'Utoikamanu

'UTOIKAMANU: This has something to do with the particular sectors where growth are happening and this is one of the reasons why it is so important that we have broad based sustainable growth in the countries. We all know that many of the countries have got large unemployed young populations and therefore it is important that what growth there is includes the provision of employment opportunities.

GARRETT: Now you told the Forum Economic Ministers that they could double their economic growth by expanding their economic base. What do you mean by that exactly?

'UTOIKAMANU: What we meant was that it should be feasible for some of the forum island countries to improve their growth performance and we were saying doubling your growth should be something to aspire to. Apart from about three or four countries in the Pacific, most of the countries are having difficulty with the impact of the global crisis and so what we're saying is if they can introduce new ways of thinking and new ways of designing and implementing policy, they can create new job opportunities through growth in their national economies.

GARRETT: What sort of areas offer the most hope in terms of jobs?

'UTOIKAMANU: In terms of jobs, we're looking at government doing its business in a smarter way, instead of looking at being the prime provider of services or being the sole provider of services, governments can think about how they can focus on service delivery from other revenues, such as the private sector.

GARRETT: So you're looking at bringing in more competition?

'UTOIKAMANU: That is one of the key factors that we're thinking about in terms of reforms for different sectors, where competition can allow growth to happen.

GARRETT: You say that the policies endorsed by past forum economic ministers meetings are sound. If that is the case, why haven't they delivered more growth in the past?

'UTOIKAMANU: Well, this is something that we had focused our remarks on and we talked about why implementation has been so poor at the national level. And we discussed things like lack of capacity. In a lot of countries, we have a lot of unemployed people, but at the same time, they don't have the right mix of skills to be able to pick up where capacity is needed. We need better policy design for governments, better policy implementation and better monitoring, that is an example of the type of constraints which unfortunately hamper governments from being able to carry out some of the policy principles that are being discussed at FEMM meetings.

GARRETT: Does more importance need to be placed on education, particularly vocational education that gives people those skills for jobs?

'UTOIKAMANU: Oh, absolutely. I think that vocational training is very important, given that not all our young population are inclined towards academic tendencies. They need to learn trade skills, they need the opportunities to put those skills into action, as a way of earning an income and certainly that is one of the areas where there is scope for broadening the economic base.

GARRETT: What action would you like to see from this forum economic ministers meeting there in Niue?

'UTOIKAMANU: Well, we're hoping that we can encourage the ministers to think a little bit about some of the options that we have flagged and look at opportunities by talking to each other, to put these into action in the hope that it will improve their economic performance.

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[pima.nius] FIJI: Media keen for 'two-way dialogue' on censorship

2:16 PM |



Title – 7101 FIJI: Media keen for 'two-way dialogue' on censorship
Date – 28 October 2010
Byline – None
Origin – Pacific Media Watch
Source – Radio Australia, 28/10/10
Copyright – RA
Status – Unabridged
----------------------------
* Pacific Media Watch Online - check the website for archive and links:
www.pacmediawatch.aut.ac.nz

* Post a comment on this story at PMW Right of Reply:
www.pacificmediacentre.blogspot.com
pmediawa@aut.ac.nz

* Pacific Media Centre on Twitter - http://twitter.com/pacmedcentre

FIJI MEDIA KEEN FOR 'TWO-WAY' DIALOGUE ON GOVERNMENT CENSORSHIP
http://www.radioaustralia.net.au/pacbeat/stories/201010/s3050437.htm

MELBOURNE (Radio Australia/Pacific Media Watch): An International Freedom of Expression Council meeting has just wrapped up in the Canadian city of Toronto.

Better known as IFEX, it brought together around 80 member countries to see how they could learn from each other and work towards preserving and promoting freedom of expression.

The focus was on some of the world's most dangerous countries for journalists, including Mexico, Russia and Tunisia.

Matai Akauola from the Pacific Islands News Association (PINA) was among the delegates.

Presenter: Geraldine Coutts
Speaker: Matai Akauola, Pacific Islands News Association

* Listen: http://www.radioaustralia.net.au/pacbeat/stories/201010/s3050437.htm

* Comment on this item pmediawa@aut.ac.nz

+++niuswire

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Wednesday, October 27, 2010

[pima.nius] EVERYTHING IS HONKY-DORY // Artist Talk // 12pm, Saturday 30 October // Fresh Gallery Otara

10:03 PM |

Fresh Gallery Otara is proud to present...
EVERYTHING IS HONKY-DORY  
ARTIST TALK  // NGAAHINA HOHAIA 
 
A unique opportunity to hear about the thinking and inspiration behind Ngaahina Hohaia's solo exhibition, Everything Is Honky-Dory.
 
WHEN: 12 - 1.30pm, Saturday 30 October
WHERE: Fresh Gallery Otara, Otara Town Centre, South Auckland
 
For more information, contact Nicole Lim on 09 271 6019 / Nicole.Lim@manukau.govt.nz
 
Presented as part of the 2010 Manukau Festival of Arts
 
Naku noa na | Regards
 
Nicole Lim
Gallery Assistant | Fresh Gallery Otara | Manukau Arts | Community Directorate
 
T 09 271 6019 | M 021 645 284 | F 274 1454 | Nicole.Lim@manukau.govt.nz | Fresh Gallery Otara | 5/46 Fairmall | Otara Town Centre | Manukau City | www.manukau.govt.nz
 
P Please consider the environment before printing this email.
 
 

CAUTION: This email message and any attachments contain information that may be confidential and may be LEGALLY PRIVILEGED. If you are not the intended recipient, any use, disclosure or copying of this message or attachments is strictly prohibited. If you have received this email message in error please notify us immediately and erase all copies of the message and attachments. We do not accept responsibility for any viruses or similar carried with our email, or any effects our email may have on the recipient computer system or network. Any views expressed in this email may be those of the individual sender and may not necessarily reflect the views of Council.

[pima.nius] Tapu Misa: Multiculturalism a tough global challenge

11:26 AM |

Tapu Misa: Multiculturalism a tough global challenge


By Tapu Misa
5:30 AM Monday Oct 25, 2010


So multiculturalism has "failed, absolutely failed", according to German Chancellor Angela Merkel. It is dead, declared another German politician. Did I hear "I told you so" from the xenophobes who claimed all along that multiculturalism was doomed to failure?

The crowing may be a little premature. The trouble with multiculturalism is that it seems to mean different things to different people.

For Merkel, "multikulti" is the idea that "we are living side by side, and are happy about it". (Which implies, I think, that multicultural nirvana was meant to happen naturally.)

For others, multiculturalism is that ill-defined policy which holds that a single country can accommodate new and disparate cultures peacefully and equitably, even when certain aspects of those cultures clash fundamentally with its own cherished traditions and values.

The former seems an increasingly distant liberal fantasy, and the latter a recipe for resentment and discord.

Disenchantment with multiculturalism isn't new. In 2006, the then British Prime Minister, Tony Blair, told immigrants they should "conform ... or don't come here".

Yet Germany's problems with its nearly three million Turkish Muslims seems to have little to do with multiculturalism. Most of the Turks are "guest workers" or their descendants who were welcomed from the 1960s and 1970s to fill Germany's labour shortages. As Merkel has admitted, they were expected to go home one day.

Erol Ozkaraca, the German-born son of a Turkish immigrant, told the BBC, "Germany has never been a multicultural society. The concept of multiculturalism was never given a chance here.

"These politicians say: 'They don't speak German, they don't want to be part of German society and they have their own structures.' But I ask: Where are the courses where we can learn German? Where is the help to integrate us?"

It seems fairly obvious that most Germans had never regarded the Turkish migrants as Germans - and since a shared sense of citizenship and identity is a basic requirement of a successful multicultural society, it doesn't seem at all odd that Germany's approach hasn't been successful.

Living in a multicultural society isn't easy, and most people, according to Robert Putnam, the political scientist and Harvard public policy professor, tend to "hunker down" and become more distrustful in the face of increasing diversity.

Putnam's research confirmed that immigration and diversity pose challenges for community cohesion - but these, he argued, could be overcome by collective effort and public policy which fostered a shared sense of citizenship and obligation.

"Our great achievement of human civilisation is our ability to redraw more inclusive lines of social identity. [The American] national motto - e pluribus unum - reflects precisely that objective - namely to create union out of diversity."

However we define multiculturalism, the challenge for multicultural societies remains the same: How do we get along despite our differences? What does it take to become a successful multicultural country? And how do we find the right balance between integration and diversity?

Blair said that the July 2005 suicide bombings in London, carried out by British Muslims, had thrown the concept of a multicultural Britain into "sharp relief". While multiculturalism should be celebrated, it had to be accompanied by a duty to share "essential values - belief in democracy, the rule of law, tolerance, equal treatment for all, respect for this country and its shared heritage". "Our tolerance is part of what makes Britain Britain," Blair said.

"So conform to it, or don't come here. We don't want the hate-mongers, whatever their race, religion or creed. The right to be different. The duty to integrate. That is what being British means."

Where does that leave us? I'd like to think our version of the multicultural society is just as respectful of difference, and inclusive, without being overweeningly deferential.

What does being a New Zealander mean? We're still working it out. But if a shared sense of identity and citizenship is a sign of multicultural health, then we can take heart.

The fact that so many people objected a few weeks ago to Paul Henry's limited definition of a New Zealander is a good sign. What matters isn't the definition so much. It's that we can all see ourselves in the picture.

Tapu.Misa@gmail.com

By Tapu Misa | Email Tapu

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[pima.nius] Pacific fisheries faces collapse within 25 years says study

11:24 AM |



---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: avaiki - jason brown <avaiki@vodafone.net.nz>
Date: 27 October 2010 20:34
Subject: [pacific-journos] [pactrade] Pacific fisheries faces collapse within 25 years says study
To: Pacific Island Journos Online <pacificmedia@googlegroups.com>


Pacific fisheries faces collapse within 25 years says study

A major study of the future of Pacific Island fisheries has indicated that fisheries across the region face collapse within the next 25 years without urgent concerted efforts to preserve stocks.

"The study, The Future of Pacific Fisheries , covers oceanic, coastal, aquaculture and freshwater fishery sectors."

It has been presented for endorsement by the Secretariat of the Pacific Community and has already been approved by members of the Pacific Islands Forum Fisheries Agency.

The projected collapse would have severe economic consequences and make food security impossible in a region where the population is projected to increase by 50 per cent by 2035.

The study says various coastal fisheries are already overexploited, and highlights signs that offshore resources are being overfished, such as bigeye tuna stocks.

The study says that national and regional fisheries agencies need to adapt to meet the growing complexity of fisheries management.

News Content © Radio New Zealand International
PO Box 123, Wellington, New Zealand

 

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Tuesday, October 26, 2010

[pima.nius] Pessimistic outlook on climate deal no deterrent

11:36 AM |

Pessimistic outlook on climate deal no deterrent

Updated October 26, 2010 09:07:40


Gloom continues to hang over negotiations for a new and binding global agreement on cutting greenhouse gas emissions.

Recent talksbetween the climate envoys from Washington and Beijing reinforced the pessimism, by failing to achieve a breakthrough ahead of the next UN climate summit in Mexico next month.

But despite the absence of an international deal, countries are taking action anyway and a new Australian study says that despite different formulations, they're all pledging to do a similar amount.

The finding puts pressure on Australia to raise it's emissions reduction ambitions at a time when Australian business is raising the pressure for the government to adopt a carbon tax.

Canberra correspondent Linda Mottram reports.

Presenter: Linda Mottram.
Speakers: Nathan Fabian, Chief Executive, Investor Group on Climate Change; Dr Frank Jotzo, director, Australian National University Centre for Climate Economics and Policy.

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[pima.nius] Pacific Voyage Media Team: News from Nagoya, Japan

11:34 AM |


Talofa,

should you wish any particular stories or photos, please contact the Pacific voyage media team at nanettew@sprep.org<mailto:nanettew@sprep.org> .

The Pacific Voyage Media Team consists of Ms. Bernadette Carreon of the Palau Horizon, Mata'afa Keni Lesa of the Samoa Observer and our Year of Biodiversity intern Mr. Clive Hawigen who is writing a daily log.

Please visit our blog for more stories and images - http://bionesian.blogspot.com that are not featured here.

Tofa soifua from Nagoya,
Nan

[cid:855440122@29012009-150F]

Secretariat of the
Pacific Regional
Environment Programme

PO Box 240, Apia, Samoa
E: sprep@sprep.org
T: +685 21929
F: +685 20231
W: www.sprep.org<http://www.sprep.org>











[cid:image002.jpg@01CB6713.3B483AA0]


Pacific Voyage News
For these stories from the Pacific Voyage Media Team and much more on the CBD COP 10, please visit http://bionesian.blogspot.com

The Pacific Voyage Media Team is suported by UNESCO and the CBD Secretariat



26 October 2010

 *   SPREP and CBD meet
 *   "We have the plan but give us the dollars" (Palau)
 *   Navigating the Pacific Voyage at the Nagoya biodiversity talks (SPREP)
 *   Global funds to address environmental concerns (GEF)
 *   Pacific examples lead the way in nature conservation (Fiji, Vanuatu)







SPREP and CBD meet


The Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme (SPREP) and the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) has agreed to work closely at the national and regional level on issues related to biodiversity and climate change.

Following a meeting with CBD Executive Secretary, Dr Ahmed Djoghlaf, Director of SPREP, David Sheppard said they discussed the existing Memorandum of Understanding and agreed to continue expanding cooperation in the future.

Mr.  Sheppard elaborated that one of the key issues discussed was the importance of strengthening of carrying outi the National Biodiversity Strategies and Action Plans (NBSAPs).

Dr Djoghlaf highlighted the planned Global Programme of Capacity Development Workshops whichwill be organized through 2011-12 to assist countries with updating their NBSAPs in line with the new strategic plan.

This will be a key component of a broader programme with the overarching aim to support implementation of the Convention.  In particular it will advance the new strategic plan and other relevant decisions from COP10 by supporting national implementation through global and regional programmes of capacity development and knowledge management.  The Partnership approach will be a main factor.

Dr Djoghlaf, in a statement presented to Mr. Sheppard stated that, "In line with the new Strategic Plan and the consolidated guidance for the development, updating and implementation of NBSAPs the workshops will assist countries to translate the Post 2010 strategic plan into national targets and commitments, and integrating these into updated NBSAPs.  This second generation of NBSAPs must be effective tools for mainstreaming biodiversity into broader national policies, strategies and planning processed."

Under the fifth allocation of funds of the Global Environment Facility (GEF-5) (2010-2014), it is expected that US500 000 will be allocated to each GEF-eligible country for biodiversity planning. The workshops, held throughout 2011 will help guide and orientate countries, in line with COP guidance, so that they can make early and effective use of these funds, thereby ensuring an early start to the process of implementing the new Strategic Plan.


"We have the plan but give us the dollars"

Pacific island countries remain adamant a new Strategic Plan to protect the environment will be adopted on Friday at the end of the 10th Meeting of Conference of the Parties (COP10) to the Convention of Biological Diversity (CBD), in Nagoya.

Joe Aitaro, of Palau and one of the key negotiators for the Pacific, said progress was slow especially in the area of funding.

"We're here, we're all very passionate and we still have hope that we're going to reach an agreement on Friday," he said.  "If not, word is that the Chairman will start an inter-government working group to work on those minor details and then present it back [to the parties].

"So there is still hope for us. But it will be a nice message when we go back to the world, especially in the year of Biodiversity that we came up with an agreement in Nagoya."

Such an agreement will be crucial "to determine the future of life on earth."

Mr Aitaro said funding is among the sensitive issues.

"The developing partners are saying they're not quite sure as how, what type of capacity we need and how it's being funded," he said.  "So they're coming up with a lot of 'add-ons' like we should have a plan for a plan to implement the plan.
"We're saying, we already have a plan, just give us the funds and we'll implement the plan. At the end of the day, it's the will of the people with the dollars. If they want to make sure we achieve the concept and the goals of this convention, they should actually start funding these activities."
Small island countries have been at the end of the line, Mr Aitaro said.

"We have been making a lot of impact on island biodiversity especially conservation management so it's time they need to shift their paradigm thinking and look at successful countries in the Pacific."

Biodiversity progress in the Pacific has been slow. But Mr Aitaro said a lot of the progress depends on funding.

"For the Pacific, when it comes to the targets for protected areas in the marine, we want to see more ambitious targets set by our partners," he said. "Globally it's like only 1.7percent of the marine is conserved, yet we in the Pacific, when we look at it as a group in the Oceania, we have the most in terms of percentage that's already in the MPA (Marine Protected Areas).

That's a testament that we're doing more with less and yet countries with the technology and resources cannot seem to mobilise [their resources] in the marine area."

The discussions about access and benefit sharing are extremely important to the Pacific, said Mr Aitaro.

"It's time where countries need to make some sacrifices and compromise," he said. "How long can this thing continue to drag? It's been two years now, we've got to put a stop to it. It comes down to compliance and for the Pacific it's our sovereign right, the ownership of these genetic resources."

Mr Aitaro said Pacific delegates are happy with the progress on marine coastal issues.

"We've got good representation in there so it's moving along but at a slow pace," he said.  "The Pacific's voice is being heard in these contact groups and it's a good indication for me that we are well represented in our areas."

Gaining financial support, however, is a priority.

In all the quarters, everyone is looking for somewhere to either get support from these private organisations or funding agencies to try and advance what's happening," he said.

"All indications coming in right now is that they are going to continue the level of funding for the CBD which to us is kind of ironic because now we're talking about ABS and no funding.  For us, there is a lot issues that depend on other countries and their interest.

"We want activities; we want the secretariat to fund activities on the ground that we have already started. We just need a little help to reach the visions of our countries."

Navigating the Pacific Voyage at Nagoya Biodiversity Talks

Easter Galuvao is SPREP's Biodiversity Advisor and one of the navigators of the Pacific Voyage at the CBD COP 10. Having only commenced her new position at SPREP in April this year, she has jumped in at the deep end with the task of coordinating the Pacific island "voyage" to the 10th international conference of the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD).

Preparations for the Conference have involved hosting a regional preparatory meeting (known as the Pre-COP), dissemination of key information, coordinating support from  – regional organisations, NGOs and key partners and developing a briefing paper for Pacific island countries to help identify key issues for the region.

"This regional approach has enabled us to amplify the Pacific voice at the COP – presenting statements on behalf of the Pacific Island parties getting our messages across," said Ms Galuvao.

This is important for small island nations striving to be heard at a 15,000 person-strong international event.

The Pacific countries have been working hard to make sure that their position on issues such as access and benefit sharing (ABS), invasive species, biodiversity and climate change, the strategic action plan and financing are well articulated at the global negotiations.

Ms Galuvao says that even though she was well-versed on the CBD, getting to fully understand the current issues for the negotiations has been a somewhat daunting experience.

"This is the first time I have attended a Conference of Parties as a SPREP representative and the first thing you need to learn is to understand the roles of IGOs in the process and how to effectively provide support to the Pacific Island Parties," she says. "There are formal working group meetings, contact group meetings and, of course the plenary sessions – you have to get your head around all these fit together first before you can do anything else".

"Then, of course, you have the history," she adds. "The draft working papers often refer to some decision made two or even three meetings ago. Those who have been attending the various meetings sometimes take it for granted that everyone else has this background."

In actual fact, having to learn the process first hand and in a short space has possibly been an unexpected advantage for SPREP's new Biodiversity Adviser and for many of the new Pacific delegates.

"Because I have had to learn myself, I have probably been more empathetic of our delegates' needs," she explains.

Certainly, Ms Galuvao's input to the preparations is not over. As the second week of the negotiations unfolds, she continues to provide her assistance where needed, and is now in the process of facilitating a high level event with Pacific Environment Ministers during the week. As one of the navigators of the Pacific Voyage, Ms. Galuvao looks forward to as smooth a sail as possible on their Pacific Voyage to Nagoya and back to the Pacific.

"The work doesn't stop here; we now have to look at actions to implement the outcomes of the Nagoya conference," she said.

Global funds to address environment concerns

The Global Environment Facility (GEF) has announced a record US$4.44 billion (T$11.24b) in funding.

The aid, the 5th replenishment, is the largest increase in new donor support for the organisation which unites 182 member governments - in partnership with international institutions, nongovernmental organisations, and the private sector - to address global environmental issues.

The announcement was made by Monique Barbut, CEO, at the 10th Meeting of Parties (COP 10) to the Convention of Biological Diversity (CBD) at Nagoya Congress Centre, Japan.

"I promise that we will do more with these resources by continuing and expanding our work programme in each GEF focal area," said Ms Barbut. "We will also do more by engaging in new and innovative activities that create synergy among various sectors."

The announcement made during a side event well attended by Pacific representatives at the Nagoya negotiations. Director of the Vailima-based SPREP (Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme), David Sheppard was among leading officials at the event.

"Clearly, we must continue our efforts to ensure the GEF remains a world class institution," Ms Barbut said. "The fifth replenishment gives us this opportunity and I want to touch on a few of our reforms that I think will cement our legacy as a catalyst for environment change."

Some of the reforms include:

 *
Commitment to being a fully integrated results-based management system for portfolio monitoring. This will include opening the project database to agencies to input data for project implementation reports.
 *
Commitment to enhance country-driven agenda. The strengthening of country ownership is top priority. GEF is also reforming the Country Support Programme for Focal points to make it even more effective. A key part will be the provision of small grants to interested countries to fund portfolio identification exercises.
 *
Expansion on direct access agenda by providing grants to countries for preparation of national reports and communications to the conventions. Countries will have the option of requesting funding either from the GEF Agencies or directly from the GEF Secretariat.
 *
Expansion of the GEF Partnership. GEF-5 Replenishment recognised that GEF would benefit from an expansion of the member and type of agencies that are able to receive resources directly from the GEF Trust Fund. This will give countries greater choice and will open GEF to a broader range of expertise and contacts.


The GEF is an independent financial organisation which provides grants for projects related to biodiversity, climate change, international waters, land degradation, the ozone layer, and persistent organic pollutants.

These projects benefit the global environment, linking local, national, and global environmental challenges and promoting sustainable livelihoods.

The GEF has a number of projects in the Pacific.

In Samoa, the Savaia Marine Biodiversity Conservation Project is one of them. This is a village-based, owned and operated protected area.

According to information on the GEF website, marine resources at Savaia are managed in a sustainable manner for the benefit of village people now and in the future.

"The aim is to sustain the momentum and success of the existing reserve by extending its boundaries to accord protection of a wider area of the village marine environment and to reintroduce certain marine species that were once abundant in the area.

"The ultimate goal is to declare a significant part of the coastal lagoon area of Savaia marine reserve and to apply sound management practices in its operations. The project has a strong partnership with the Fisheries Division providing on-going technical support."





Pacific examples lead the way in nature conservation



The Pacific Voyage Media Team, 26 October Nagoya Japan - Fiji has demonstrated that they are a model for the Pacific in adopting and putting into practice ridge-to-reef management, also known as ecosystem-based management (EBM).

Eleni Rova Tokaduadua, from the Ministry of Local Government, Housing, Urban Development and Environment of Fiji, conducted a presentation that showcased how this nation was able to mainstream EBM practice both into government policies and implement it at the community level.

Community-based ecosystem management led to the adoption of a range of management measures, including fishing gear restrictions, restrictions on fishing methods, protection of species and the establishment of networks of marine and terrestrial protected areas.

EBM takes into account interactions among species, habitats and biophysical processes. Central to EBM is the idea that humans are an integral part of the ecosystem, since humans derive various services from the ecosystem and can also influence ecosystem processes.

As Fiji has shown, people can influence and manage ecosystems on many levels, from locally-based approaches to nationally applied policies.

Pacific Island nations are facing critical environmental issues – pollution, habitat destruction, declining fisheries and climate change – which threaten their coastal ecosystems and impact on food security and well being.

Ecosystem-based management (EBM) offers an innovative approach to managing these threats in coastal ecosystems as it designs solutions to ecological issues with regard to social, economic and political drivers. This approach involves holistic thinking with participation from a broad range of stakeholders, including the government and traditional leaders, and differs markedly from a sectoral approach..

Tokaduadua says that the Fiji government has put in place statutes to address environmental issues, including the Environment Management Act 2005, which authorized the creation of Fiji's Integrated Coastal Management Committee. The Committee is explicitly applying EBM concepts to develop a National Coastal Plan for Fiji.

Vanuatu has also taken a leadership role in actively implementing EBM. Touasi Tiwok of the Vanuatu Department of Environment highlighted a case study where vetiver grass and acacia trees have been planted to trap sediment and re-establish indigenous forest in Aneityum Island, which suffers from erosion that has reduced the health of the adjacent coral reefs.

Tiwok says the great success of the project was due to the commitment of the small band of workers who shown dedication in forestry planting to prevent erosion sites. It might have taken years but the project paid off improving the state of its shores from erosion.

In the same event, Stacy Jupiter, the Wildlife Conservation Society Fiji Country Program Director, launched a guide book on EBM principles to help governments, communities and conservation practitioners incorporate this approach into their management practices. The guide is specifically tailored to the needs and conditions of island countries in the Pacific."


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Monday, October 25, 2010

[pima.nius] Audio Report: New technology and its impact aired at PIMA 2010 conference

11:20 AM |

Audio Report: New technology and its impact aired at PIMA 2010 conference


Sandra Kailahi

A discussion on cultural and media standards was facilitated by television journalist and author Sandra Kailahi at the 2010 PIMA conference. Photo: Kim Bowden

Pacific Scoop:
Audio Report – By Tupouseini Taumoepeau.

Tupouseini Taumoepeau reports that the Pacific Islands Media Association Conference held earlier this month discussed the "new era" of technology and the impact this will have on the media and the Pacific community. The conference included workshops focussing on current issues and involved a diverse group of networks.

An open panel discussion addressed the issues of media access among Pacific people, what the Pacific media is doing to cater to this and their views of this shift from traditional to new media.

Tupouseini Taumoepeau is a Graduate Diploma in Journalism student on the Reporting the 

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[pima.nius] WEST PAPUA: Comment - Focus on torture video, NZ policy and media

11:19 AM |


Title – 7098 WEST PAPUA: Comment - Focus on torture video, NZ policy and media
Date – 25 October 2010
Byline – None
Origin – Pacific Media Watch
Source – Pacific Scoop, 22/10/10
Copyright – PS
Status – Unabridged
----------------------------
* Pacific Media Watch Online - check the website for archive and links:
www.pacmediawatch.aut.ac.nz

* Post a comment on this story at PMW Right of Reply:
www.pacificmediacentre.blogspot.com
pmediawa@aut.ac.nz

* Pacific Media Centre on Twitter - http://twitter.com/pacmedcentre

DEADLINE: McCULLY'S MORAL DUTY TO WEST PAPUA
http://pacific.scoop.co.nz/2010/10/deadline-mccullys-moral-duty-to-west-papua/

By Rory MacKinnon.

WELLINGTON (Pacific Scoop/Pacific Media Watch):  With all the Hobbit-chat of late you could be forgiven for thinking it was a slow newsweek – but here at the Scoop offices it was nothing of the sort. On Monday, the independent West Papua Media network released video it had received of Indonesian soldiers torturing two Papuan men: punching and kicking them, running a bayonet over one's throat and burning the other's penis with a charred stick. [WARNING: Link features real and graphic violence]

Within hours the horrific footage made the headlines of Al-Jazeera, the BBC, CNN and the Sydney Morning Herald, while Amnesty International and other NGOs demanded an independent investigation by Indonesia's National Human Rights Commission.

Meanwhile, coverage here in the Shire was practically non-existent, other than here at Pacific Scoop and the equally tiny newsroom at Radio New Zealand International. Even MFAT didn't bother to brief our foreign minister Murray McCully on the video – despite his going on a two-day trip to Indonesia the very next day.

* Read the full article here:
http://pacific.scoop.co.nz/2010/10/deadline-mccullys-moral-duty-to-west-papua/

* Also, media analysis on Cafe Pacific:
http://cafepacific.blogspot.com/2010/10/mccully-and-nz-medias-moral-failure.html

* Comment on this item pmediawa@aut.ac.nz

+++niuswire

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[pima.nius] Video Report: Kalafi Moala details differences between PasiMA and PINA

11:17 AM |

Video Report: Kalafi Moala details differences between PasiMA and PINA

Kalafi Moala

Kalafi Moala talks about Pacific media. Photo: Pippa Brown/PMC

Pacific Scoop:
Video Report – By Eva Evguenieva.

Kalafi Moala, vice-chair of the Pacific's new media freedom group PasiMA, delivered the keynote speech at the 2010 Pacific Islands Media Association (PIMA) conference in Auckland. Reporting for Pacific Scoop, Eva Evguenieva asked Moala what set PasiMA apart from Suva-based PINA and what caused its formation.

Moala says unlike PINA, PasiMA is not based in Fiji and Samoa-based PasiMA will not be silent over erosions into media freedom in the Pacific region.

Eva Evguenieva is a Postgraduate Diploma in Communication Studies student on the Asia-Pacific Journalism course at AUT University.

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Thursday, October 21, 2010

Re: [pima.nius] FIJI: Media Development Authority sets up structure

2:19 PM |

Has the decree been posted here. Could someone post it please. This is very interesting. Thanks

On Fri, Oct 22, 2010 at 7:43 AM, pima news <pima.nius@gmail.com> wrote:

Title – 7092 FIJI: Media Development Authority sets up structure
Date – 21 October 2010
Byline – Roland Koroi
Origin – Pacific Media Watch
Source – Fiji Broadcasting Corporation, 21/10/10
Copyright – FBC
Status – Unabridged
----------------------------
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www.pacmediawatch.aut.ac.nz

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* Pacific Media Centre on Twitter - http://twitter.com/pacmedcentre

FIJI MEDIA DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY SETTING UP
http://www.radiofiji.com.fj/fullstory.php?id=31691

By Roland Koroi

SUVA (Fiji Broadcasting Corporation/Pacific Media Watch): The chairman of the Fiji Media Development Authority, Professor Subramani, says it is presently setting up its infrastructure so that the authority could be fully operational within a month.

The position of secretary for the Media Development Authority will be advertised in the next week and an office space has been earmarked.

Subramani told FBC News the authority would be proactive in working with the media, and constructively help support the development of quality media services, as well as interpret the provisions in the media decree.

On Fiji being ranked by Reporters Without Borders as the lowest country in the Pacific for media freedom, Subramani says many people have not read the decree carefully enough and have misconceptions about it.

He says the decree provides for media guidelines that were previously not present and should be looked at as a stage in the evolution of the media industry in Fiji.

Subramani told FBC News the authority had not received any formal complaints as yet but there had been some comments and "a couple" of verbal complaints.

* Comment on this item pmediawa@aut.ac.nz

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PACIFIC MEDIA WATCH ONLINE
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PACIFIC MEDIA WATCH is a media and educational resource compiled by the AUT Pacific Media Centre for the Pacific region.

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pacific islands media association
pima.nius@gmail.com
aotearoa, new zealand
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pacific islands media association
pima.nius@gmail.com
aotearoa, new zealand
----------------------------------------
The pima.nius googlegroup is a facility for discussion and distributing information. Content sent by this googlegroup are forwarded from various networks and media publications.
 
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